‘Counting’ – wot so funee?

Most of my wot so funee? posts so far have been about Andrew’s toddlerisms. But Joel has just started to produce some hilarious funees in his speech. He doesn’t say a lot, but what he does say is great! Recently he’s become very keen to ‘count’ before doing something – for example the ‘1-2-3-wheeeee’ game that we play when two adults are each holding one of his hands and on the count of 3 we pick him up and swing him to ‘wheeeee’. The thing is, he doesn’t actually say ‘1 2 3’, but rather something more like ‘wee-baa-wee-baa-wheeeeeeeee!!’ but you can tell that it’s his way of counting by the intonation and that he does it and then stops it before doing some action. I managed to capture it today when he was throwing some balls in the garden – counting before he let go of each ball. Plus some tennis balls into the pot fun following the counting….

 

 

Wot So Funee?

Breastfeeding toddlers & beyond: not as weird as you might think – #KBBF2014

The theme for today in the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Scavenger Hunt is “Breastfeeding Beyond a Year”. I still remember the feeling when Andrew, my eldest son, got to his first birthday and was still breastfeeding. At the time I wrote a blog post on it called the not-so-crazy world of toddler breastfeeding. After all the struggles we’d had in the early weeks and months (as I explained in my last KBBF post, I have IGT – insufficient glandular tissue – so can’t exclusively breastfeed a baby), I could hardly believe that we’d got to 12 weeks let alone 12 months. But he was still keen to feed, or nurse would be a better term as it really wasn’t about the food anymore but about the comfort and routine. And I always said that I wanted him to decide when to wean and it wouldn’t be me who would initiate the weaning process. So we carried on beyond the time that most mums I knew were breastfeeding.

Apart from his lack of interest in weaning, there are other good reasons to have carried on nursing a toddler (and now preschooler). I think that it’s helped in the fact that he’s still hardly ever been ill. Nursing has been fundamental in his daily bedtime routine for a long time, along with a bath and reading books. He likes to have that routine and I think it has helped him know that it’s bedtime before he could understand properly what was going on. Nursing has also helped when he’s been upset or tired over the years, to calm him down, though these days he only really has some milk before bed.

 

When Andrew was around 13 months old, I found I was pregnant again. This brought with it all sorts of thoughts and feelings about breastfeeding, for example: I had bad vomiting and nausea throughout the pregnancy and wondered if I had the energy to carry on and how I should initiative weaning in that case; I wondered if Andrew would self-wean anyway, as many do during the pregnancy of a sibling; I wondered if/how it would work out with tandem nursing if he did want to carry on. I wrote about these thoughts at various times in my weekly pregnancy diary blog posts, such as this one.

Well we both made it with the breastfeeding through pregnancy thing, and when Joel was born, we became a tandem nursing family. I had lots of support from my local LLL group, and one leader in particular had gone out of her way to help put me in contact with another LLL leader from elsewhere in the country who had tandem nursed with IGT. She made the good point that the toddler is an excellent breast pump substitute in terms of giving the breasts extra stimulation after the newborn feeds (of course you can’t get the milk back from the toddler though, like you can from a bottle of pumped milk, and give it to the baby, but I never got much from a pump anyway.)

As Andrew was basically down to just having one feed before bedtime, I made sure that Joel had had good feeds himself up to that point, and then he had time with Daddy whilst Andrew and I had milk time. He probably was getting very little actual milk by that point in the day, but as he’d nursed through pregnancy, when milk supply drops naturally even in mums without IGT, he was used to that. He just liked the time with me, and I think the tandem nursing helped him accept Joel into the family, although he was young enough to not really care that much anyway. Sometimes Andrew would ask for milk while I was sitting feeding Joel in the day – an increased interest in nursing can happen with older siblings, even if already weaned, so he wasn’t unusual in this, and would usually be happy with a few sucks from the other side, just to mark his ground more than anything I think. There weren’t many times that I would actually have one feeding from each side at the same time – tandem nursing refers to breastfeeding 2 (or more) children in the same time period, not necessarily precisely simultaneously.

Joel seemed to get more breast milk than Andrew did at the same age – I could tell partly from the fact that he needed less formula supplementation and partly because his poos looked so much more breastfed than Andrew’s ever did pre-solids! Many mums, with and without IGT, report increased milk supply with subsequent children. So even if Andrew was taking a little of the shared supply when Joel was a baby, I was happy that over the span of their nursing years, they were getting their own fair share.

Before I knew it, we somehow managed to get to a whole year of tandem nursing; it dawned on me that I was tandem nursing 2 toddlers, and nowadays a toddler and a preschooler.  Neither of them nurse for very long these days, but both of them still enjoy Mummy milk before bed. I think Andrew is slowly on the stopping straight because he doesn’t ask for it every day now, but I’ve heard that this is how self-weaning at this age can happen – a slow process that you look back on and can’t pin point an exact time that they stopped, the breastfeeds just go down from once a day to once a week to once a month etc. We often joke that at this rate, Joel will stop before Andrew, because he’s probably less interested in it than Andrew was at this age, but who knows! (Only they know.)

I look back now and can’t quite believe that I’m sitting here writing this, given our shaky start in the world of breastfeeding. But I’m glad that we persevered through the hard times to get to this point. When I think about how much breast milk that my boys have had over their nursing lives, it’s probably similar to how much some babies had who were exclusively breastfed for the 6 months that is seen as the ‘standard’ amount of time to breastfeed for. Some people may think that breastfeeding or nursing toddlers is weird, and pre-schoolers even weirder, but it works for us and I’m happy to carry on for as long as they require, which may turn out to be not much longer.

Others who are writing about breastfeeding beyond a year today include….. (please go and visit their blogs too).

Sorry about the mess

Circus Queen

Hex Mum

My thoughts on things

Baking Betsy

And another WAHM like myself taking part in the hunt is

Cherub Chews

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The lion guinea pig – wot so funee?

I know there was a series of wot so funee? posts that I wrote a while back which were always mentioning Thunderbirds. Well Andrew is still very into Thunderbirds and playing with his Tracey Island and Thunderbird toy rockets etc., but he’s expanded his repertoire to other Gerry Anderson puppet series. His favourite one to talk about at the moment is Joe 90, which I don’t think so many people have heard of. That is my impression at least when Andrew starts jabbering on to random strangers (admittedly other parents at groups and activities that we do) about his knowledge of Joe 90. They usually smile and nod and say the usual ‘oh right, that’s good’ kind of phrases that we parents do when we can’t understand another child. I think his speech itself is clear, but they don’t always understand who Joe 90 is or why Andrew is talking to them out of the blue about him. It’s quite hilarious seeing him do this to unsuspecting people who don’t know how to react. He’ll talk to anyone and everyone, no hesitation.

It’s not just strangers who get bombarded with an earful of jabbering from our little chatterbox. Grandad took him in the car on Sunday, just the 2 of them, to pick up Great Grandma. He didn’t stop chattering the whole time in the car apparently, and of course insisted that they listened to Joe 90 on the CD player, on repeat, several times! Still, I can’t feel too sorry for Grandad – it’s his fault that Andrew is obsessed with Gerry Anderson puppetry.

Now that Andrew himself is well and truly toilet trained in the daytime, he finds it funny when Joel has a dirty nappy. He’s particularly vocal about describing the mess when he sees it. I’m usually too busy trying to pin Joel down to clear him up before he runs off and gets it everywhere to really take much notice of how Andrew is reacting, but I managed to note down a classic that came out when Daddy was around too: “It’s a disgusting spready weddy poo!” A toddler technical term there. I also liked how he described one of Joel’s nappies as a “displosion” the other day. It was certainly an epic explosion, so maybe a “displosion” is one step up on the scale of explosiveness?!

Moving on from poo (you know you’re a parent of young kids when you can write so glibly about poo), Andrew is still keen to make up his own verbs from nouns that he knows. He’s been doing this for quite a while now, and at the weekend he was on top form in the garden with various sports. He told Daddy to “just golf it!”, when he was trying to get him to hit the golf ball with the club (all plastic). And recently I’ve heard him talking about “tennis-ing the ball” – i.e. hitting a ball with a bat.

We know that Andrew is very good at milking sympathy when something is up. But just recently he’s been stepping this up a little too far in my opinion. A few times now he has been loudly in tears for some reason or another, maybe he’d hurt himself slightly or got annoyed about some (seemingly insignificant) occurrence, and then he has rapidly turned off the water works and stated quite openly “I’ve finished now” and got on happily with something else. Leaving me open mouthed at what he’d just done.

And finally for this week, an insight into his imagination as a 3 year old. We have a red cuddly toy in the car at the moment, which Granny kindly gave us from their car one day when the boys weren’t happy about getting in (it was after our recent beach trip and to be fair I’d have rather stayed longer too but we knew we had a long drive home). I think it was supposed to be a dinosaur for Comic Relief, as it roars when you squeeze it. One day this week, Andrew held it up when he was getting into his car seat and declared that “this is like a lion guinea pig!” I can kind of see where he’s coming from, but it did make me laugh out loud. What do you think?

Lion guinea pig

 

Wot So Funee?

Row, row, row your plane/fire engine/motorbike – wot so funee?

I’m a bit behind this week with blogging. With being away for the weekend and then the bank holiday, plus lots of orders and a craft fair keeping me busy sewing, I’ve not had much time to blog! But here are a few classic comedy moments from this past week…

We’ve been talking about moving house for quite a while. We have a house lined up, we just haven’t got the keys yet and we can’t move in until it’s decorated too, so for now we’re still living with Granny and Grandad who are very kindly not kicking us out. But I think Andrew is starting to wonder whether we’ll ever move out into our new house. As he, Daddy and Joel were walking down the road to the park the other day, he gave an insight into what’s going on in his mind on this matter. About 5 minutes walk from Granny and Grandad’s house is a house that is currently undergoing a big extension on the side. We’ve walked past it several times before, but on this occasion on their way to the park, Andrew stated: “When our new house is finished, we will live here!” I know we said we’d live nearer to Granny and Grandad, but we were thinking 25 miles rather than 250 metres.

When we do move house, I don’t think our post lady will mind as she will have fewer parcels to deliver on her rounds (I get quite a few small parcels delivered for the business) and she won’t get greeted by a naked 3 year old when I open our door. Most days we’re in when she delivers as it’s not normally until around 2pm that she turns up and usually Joel is napping then. But we did miss a parcel last week when we stayed out until after lunch, so the following day we drove to the delivery office to collect it. I think it blew Andrew’s mind when he saw how many post vans were parked outside the office (to be fair, there were probably around 30!): “Wow! There’s lots of postman pats here!!”

Another chirp from the back of the car came when we stopped to fill up with petrol at the weekend on our long journey. Daddy got out to do the filling up, and Andrew shouted across to him from his car seat: “How many petrols are you getting Daddy?” I’m not entirely sure how many litres our car takes, but I know it costs a fair amount to fill up these days, so I just said to Andrew that we needed a lot of petrol.

Cars are just one of Andrew’s favourite vehicles. He’s interested in anything with wheels really. One day this week I found he’d emptied a basket underneath his bed where we store his underwear and was sitting in it pretending it was a plane, holding out his arms for the wings. I laughed, and said maybe we could pretend it was a boat and sing ‘row, row, row your boat’. He wasn’t too impressed with this and shouted: “No! I want to do row, row, row your plane!” I laughed even more at that and said I didn’t think planes could be rowed. He pondered for a moment, then came out with: “How about row, row, row your fire engine then?…..Or row, row, row your motorbike?” By this point he was laughing whilst talking too, so we both ended up in fits of laughter together.

row your plane

Green fingered Andrew has been helping Granny with seed planting and care in her vegetable garden this year. One of the tasks is of course watering them (though this week they really don’t need it with all the rain, not that that stops Joel trying to ‘water’ them some more – i.e. tipping whole pots of water onto the soil). One sunnier day last week, Grany said to Andrew that the plants were thirsty and needed something to drink. He looked a bit puzzled and then exclaimed: “But plants don’t have mouths!” Fair enough, they don’t, and it’s a bit of a far-out concept to him to imagine how plants drink when they don’t have a mouth like he does.

That’s it for this week, but I’m sure we’ll be back with more hilarity next week 🙂

Wot So Funee?

A walk around Rydal Water – #CountryKids

One thing that we were amazed about when we were on holiday in the Lake District recently was just how much Andrew was willing to walk. He can be a bit fussy when we’re at home, walking some of the way to places but not reliable enough for me not to take his sling to hop him up on my back if he gets tired. One day in the week away we decided to do a walk around Rydal water, up above the lake on Loughrigg terrace for most of the way, except at both ends when we came down to the waterside to cross the river. On the map this is about 3 miles, plus some climbs. Although we took his sling, Andrew walked pretty much the whole way, only being carried for a couple of 5 minute periods. He was our little mountain goat 🙂 I think his bargain walking boots for 99p off eBay might have helped spur him on, and the odd go-faster snack.

The walk was relatively easy, but with stunning views on the way round. We found all sorts of nature to look at and pick up. Andrew took a liking to a stick that was just the right size to be a walking stick for him, and Pop got out his pen knife to carve him a handle by stripping the bark off it at the top. At one point we spotted a tree with a hollow trunk, so Andrew hopped up inside it and thought this was hilarious. Joel was on my back for the first part of the walk until we stopped for a picnic lunch half way round, and then did some walking himself. High up on the terrace we got some amazing views down to Rydal Water on our way around.

Rydal 1 jpg

At the far end of the lake we came back down to the water level and had our picnic by the river that runs between Grasmere (lake) and Rydal Water. We then walked along this river towards Grasmere, and crossed over a bridge that was fantastic for Pooh sticks, just before the lake itself. We stopped on the shore of Grasmere for a little while, so the boys could have a play. Andrew was keen to try and learn stone skimming techniques from Grandad and Pop, and Joel was fascinated with a rather large rock that he could sit on and jump off! The weather was quite warm by this point, so we were happy to stand around for a bit. The view across Grasmere towards the village of the same name was lovely.

Rydal 2 jpg

As we carried on, we walked up again onto the terrace on the other side of Rydal Water, to continue our circular route around it. The views back across the lake were still fantastic, with fewer trees in the way on this side. Both boys were walking on this side for a while, until Joel got tired again and went back on my back, though as I said, Andrew was keen to carry on walking himself. As we neared the end of the lake, towards the car park where we had left the cars, the path came back down near the lake shore again. This was another great excuse to try some stone skimming, and Joel even went for a little paddle in his boots. Both of them clearly found this a lot of fun!

The walk was just the right length for a day out with toddlers, and we all enjoyed it with the views and the weather being particularly good to us.

Rydal 3 jpg

Linking up with the fab #CountryKids linky over at Coombe Mill’s blog

Country Kids from Coombe Mill Family Farm Holidays Cornwall

Are we there yet?

I’ve recently handed over my role as Editor of The Voice, quarterly magazine of the Cambridge branch of the NCT. I very much enjoyed volunteering for the charity in this way, but it was time to move on being as we no longer live in Cambridge and I would like to take on other things (mainly Sewn Down Purple Lane). During my time as Editor, I wrote quite a few articles, some of which I think are relevant beyond just Cambridge, so I thought I’d share some on this blog. First up is an article I wrote recently about our experience of long distance car travel with little ones. I hope you find it useful if you’re planning a long journey with young children soon.

The location of our boys’ grandparents’ (holiday) homes – Devon, West Midlands and Lake District – means that we’ve done our fair share of middle-to-long distance car journeys with them at various ages. Before kids, we used to catch the train down to Devon, but as the route means two (overground) trains as well as hopping on the tube across London, we haven’t fancied that with a baby, toddler, or baby and toddler, plus all the paraphernalia that travels with them for a week away. Cross-country (i.e. not through London) train services to the Midlands aren’t something we enjoyed even without kids. And for the Lakes, it’s handy to have our own car for getting around once we’re up there

Cumming car 1

Planning ahead

The first time we attempted the Midlands trip – which takes about 1 hour 45 minutes in good traffic – with each baby, they were 2-3 months old. As they were still quite unpredictable with feeding and sleeping, we couldn’t really tell when was the best time of day to travel from their point of view, so we just went for it and ended up stopping for a feeding break or two, even though we’d normally do this distance in one run.

For about the first 6 months or so, neither of them liked being in a car seat for very long awake, so we took it in turns to sit in the back and try to keep them calm and reassure them. Joel didn’t seem as distressed as Andrew did at the same age, probably because he had his big brother in the back with him too, pulling silly faces and chucking toys at him! If you have to drive alone with a rear-facing baby in the back, a mirror attached to the back seat’s headrest means they can see your face reflected in your rear-view mirror.

As they got older, we would usually time our journey for when they would normally nap or sleep (early afternoon or evening), since they both started to sleep well in the car, though Andrew is less likely to drop off now that he’s just turned 3. But neither of them have slept for the entire journey to Devon or the Lakes – about 6-7 hours with a couple of breaks in good traffic.

Entertainment central

Cumming car 2So what to do during awake time? As babies, toys attached to the car seat were handy, so when they inevitably got thrown out, whoever was sitting in the back could easily retrieve them. It’s also amazing how long games like ‘peekaboo’ and ‘pulling silly faces’ can entertain a bored baby in a car.

One of our best buys since having kids has been our in-car DVD player for long journeys from around the age of 1. It attaches to the back of the driver’s/front passenger’s headrest for back passengers to view, or on the back seat’s headrest if baby/toddler is still rear facing. I have also heard of iPads/tablets (which we don’t have) and a car headrest holder (available to buy online) serving the same purpose. The novelty of a new (to us) DVD or one not watched for a while has worked wonders at entertaining them in the car. Of course music CDs go down well too.

So far Andrew seems to be fine at reading on the go (something which makes me car sick), so a new magazine does the trick of amusing him for a good hour or so. We’ve also just got into playing the simple game of ‘spot the [insert colour] car [or other common/rare vehicle]’, particularly in slower moving traffic, and this encourages him to look out of the window and take in our surroundings. As much as we don’t like being stuck in traffic, watching out for emergency vehicles if there has been an accident is very exciting for a vehicle-obsessed toddler.

As they get older, I’m looking forward to playing more games, some of which we used to play as children on long car journeys, for example ‘I spy’ or making words with the letters on registration plates, and some of which I have discovered from friends or the book Are we there yet? by Jo Pink. One friend of my parents, who has two girls a few years older than Andrew, takes an Argos catalogue for each daughter on long car journeys: she sets the girls ‘tasks’ from the catalogue, for example they have to find the cheapest set of saucepans or the most expensive television, or they have to plan their dream bedroom or toy collection and add up how much it would all cost (if they were ever lucky enough to get it!) Apparently this keeps them amused for hours, and it’s totally free!

Expect the unexpected

Cumming car 3Apart from thinking about entertainment, it’s important to plan food, drink and other supplies when driving with little ones. We always take more than we think we’ll need, in case of hold ups, and a substantial packed lunch and other snacks mean we can eat and drink if stationary rather than having to wait to pull in at the next services. When travelling in winter we pack coats and sturdy shoes so they are easy to get at if we need to stop or were to break down. And in (warm) summer we take plenty of drinks. On that note, the potty is also handy to have close at hand

I can’t say that I’ve enjoyed every single moment of car journeys with the boys, but we’ve certainly learned how to make the most of them and try to avoid pitfalls.

Biting the hand that feeds you – wot so funee?

So far my wot so funee? posts have mainly featured Andrew, eldest brother of two. This week, a particular interaction between him and younger brother Joel made me laugh out loud, even though Andrew didn’t find it particularly funny. Like a nice and kind big brother, Andrew offered Joel a mini cheddar biscuit from his packet. That was cute. Then things got cuter when he even offered to put it into Joel’s mouth for him. However, the cuteness faded when Joel took a chunk out of not only the biscuit, but also Andrew’s finger! Talk about biting the hand that feeds you! Andrew looked at me, lip wobbling and said: “Joel bit me!” Luckily he didn’t actually cry, so it can’t have been that bad. But it was just the face that said it all – why?? If you stick your fingers in a 16 month old’s mouth, you won’t come out unscathed!

Moving on to a different kind of food – one you don’t have to bite: ice cream. We had this as a yummy treat for pudding the other day, and when asked which flavour he’d like out of vanilla or ginger (it was fancy stuff!), his reply was: “I’d like miller”. Once again Andrew demonstrating perfectly a phenomenon common to English-learning kids: picking up the stressed syllable (and the one after it) but not the preceding unstressed syllable – so he heard ‘nilla > miller.

Apart from ice cream, Andrew loves bananas. A taste he shares with Daddy but not me. He was eating one the other day, and Grandad thought he would be funny and call Andrew a monkey, joking at the fact that he was eating a banana. But this didn’t go down too well… “I’m not a monkey [sad face]….I’m a rocket!” See, it always has to come back to rockets. And there was us all thinking he was a boy.

I’m sure Andrew isn’t the only 3 year old who is easily pleased. There are several things in life that make him happy, and none of them or very expensive or complicated. For example, the other day when we were driving along, he randomly came out with: “Windy things make me happy!” After a little more probing, it turns out he was talking about windmills, probably the kind that we had on our balcony in bright colours. No idea where that came from!

Another thing that makes him happy is playing for endless hours in the garden – or the “ball garden” as he calls it (Granny and Grandad’s garden where we are currently living). One afternoon we were playing out there, and Andrew was waving a plastic golf club in the air. To try and encourage him to bring it down to a height that didn’t risk a disaster involving the club whacking Joel in the face, I took it off him and started to use it like a hockey stick to move a small ball along the grass…

Me: “Come on, let’s play hockey Andrew!”

Andrew: “No Mummy, don’t be silly, that’s not cocky, it’s golf!”

And to end on a similar note to where I began this post, we have another cute exchange between the brothers, overheard on the monitor one morning. Since the mornings have got lighter, we have reinstalled our lighting system – a cheaper version of a Gro-clock type thing, made from an ordinary lamp and a timer switch. When it’s off, it’s time to sleep, and when it comes on (at 7am), he is allowed to get up and go into Granny and Grandad’s room. But the thing is, there’s one rule for him, and one rule for little brother, who hasn’t understood the idea of the magic light and crescendos once he’s woken up until I go in and fish him out of their room. At about 6.30am I heard this: “No Joel, the light hasn’t come on yet, it’s not time to get up, we must sleep!” Nice try Andrew, I wish it was that easy to reason with your little brother.

Wot So Funee?

To the steering wheel shop – wot so funee?

In the past couple of weeks, Andrew has well and truly given up his afternoon nap. It wasn’t’ bad going at all to be still napping beyond his 3rd birthday, so I can’t complain, but it does mean that he is around in the afternoon. He is actually very happy to just play on his own for a while, and seems to like the time without Joel (who has at least some nap in the afternoon) to play with the toys that Joel isn’t allowed. However, it does mean he can also get into more mischief now that he’s roaming around downstairs rather than enclosed in his bedroom.

One afternoon last week, I suddenly became aware that I could hear some noises coming from the kitchen. Just as I was about to get up from the sofa and investigate, Andrew came in to the living room and said… “Look Mummy, I made myself some squash!” Wot so funee about that, you may ask? Well, I was sceptical that he’d managed to do that all on his own, so I asked to have a look. As I thought, he had poured neat squash into one of his drinks bottles and was drinking it undiluted from a straw. So I gently brought him back to the kitchen, where I saw the scene of devastation that was half a bottle of squash spilled all over the work surface and a pack of straws strewn across the floor. I had to admire his independence and determination to do it himself, but it took me a while to clear up!

Andrew is becoming very keen on pretend play, for example with the toy kitchen and making us cups of tea and cake, and also acting out role plays. I saw him sitting on the floor with arms out in front of him, brumming like a car. He caught my eye and the following conversation started…

A: “I’m in my car Mummy”

Me: “Ah I can see, where are you going Andrew?”

A: “To the steering wheel shop to buy a steering wheel”

Me: “Of course! That’s obviously what you buy from a steering wheel shop!”

I did wonder how he was driving the car in the first place, but I didn’t like to go down that route.

I’m used to being handed random blocks or bricks and having to play along with the fact that they are really cakes/biscuits/something else edible. Except I did this automatically the other day, and started to pretend I was eating a block of Duplo, thinking I was supposed to be treating it like a cake. But then I got told off…

A: “No it’s not an eaty marble, it’s a rolly marble!”

Me: “I can’t see any marbles Andrew?!”

A: “It’s a marble holder that, I just said, not a cake!”

Me: “Ah sorry I must have missed that!”

Now that we’re living with Granny and Grandad temporarily, they too have been experiencing quite a few funee moments first hand, and relaying them to me. Here’s a good one from the other morning when they were watching Cbeebies together and a cow called Buttercup came on screen…

Granny: “Buttercup – that’s a classic name for a cow.”

A: “I do like plastic names!”

I wrote a few weeks ago about Andrew using nouns that he knows as verbs – for example, to fork something (get it on his fork). This week he was playing in the garden with a ball, and came out with “I want to tennis it!” We presume he meant he wanted to serve it off the bat, or maybe just throw it.

And finally for this week, here’s another example of Andrew deliberately changing the words of a song for effect. He loves singing, and knows the words to quite a few songs (in French and German as well as English), but every now and then he likes to make his own words up to a song that I know he knows the real words to. This week we had: “All do the hocus pocus!” And I know full well that he’s known the words to the Hokey Cokey for a long time, since he sang it most weeks at the music group he and Daddy went to in Cambridge on Tuesday mornings.

Wot So Funee?

Heaven’s level crossing – wot so funee?

Recently Andrew has been getting more into drawing. He still won’t do it for very long at a time, but he will generally give it a go, mood permitting. And this week we have our very first funee on paper (as opposed to in speech), which is actually where the idea of the wot so funee linky started over at Actually Mummy’s blog. As usual, Andrew went out to his group at children’s church on Sunday, and came back with a picture that he had drawn and stuck, obviously with the help of the leaders. They had been talking about what Heaven will be like, and what will be there, and they made pictures on this theme. You can see Andrew’s here: smiley face, guitars, music, trees, hearts, flowers, rainbow, animals… and a purple splodge. When I asked him why this splodge was, he replied: “a level crossing”! You see in Andrew’s world, level crossings are amazing, so clearly if Heaven is amazing, it must contain level crossings. Good bit of toddler logic there. 

Heaven picture

Other than this, we’ve had the usual kind of funees too over the past 2 weeks (we had a break for Pancake Day last week and I wrote about our jar of change instead). After the plain pants incident a little while ago, I thought Andrew might be cottoning on to the meaning of ‘plain’ spelled like that. But not quite yet it seems. As we were walking into town last week, we saw some blue flashing lights and heard a siren coming towards us on the road. When it got nearer, I realised that it was an unmarked police car, and said “Look it’s a plain police car Andrew!” His response was classic: “Ahhhh, it’s going to the airport then!” Of course it is!

In many ways Andrew is like me, we share several personality traits. I find it hilarious when he says something that I have clearly said to him before, and it makes him seem even more like me. When I was shoving the ingredients for kedgeree in the slow cooker the other day, which isn’t a hard meal to prepare, he asked what I was doing, and when I gave my answer, his response was: “Wow, that’s impressive!” If you think so Andrew, that’s great, but I really don’t think it’s that hard. I know I often remark that something is impressive, and often with a sense of irony, so I presume he’s just following in my footsteps here. Another example from the bath the other day… he was getting annoyed that his toys kept slipping of the ledge that he was trying to rest them on at the side: “No, NO! I’ve told you several times, don’t fall off!!” I know I’ve said that to him, after he’s failed to listen to me despite several repetitions of whatever it was I was asking.

But I shouldn’t worry. I may get annoyed at his selective hearing, but he still thinks highly of me: “I like you Mummy…. you’re like Mummy Pig!” Thanks Andrew, I think I should take that as a compliment given how much you like Peppa and family, but being likened to a pig isn’t really what I strive for.

CrumpetAnd to finish with, we have a couple of cases of Andrew getting just one sound wrong in a word and it making for comedy moments. Last week we found some crumpets in the freezer, and ate some toasted for lunch. The next day when I asked what he’d like for lunch, he replied: “Crispy trumpets! I love crispy trumpets, they’re my favourite!”

When playing with his Tracy Island toy, of course one or more of the Thunderbirds always saves the day and rescues people in distress. One day this week Andrew told us that the rescued people were now “safe and sand”. Almost, but not quite.

Wot So Funee?

Milking it with milkshake – wot so funee?

It’s started: Andrew now knows exactly how to cause us embarrassment when out and about by people watching and saying what he sees. He has the observational and vocabulary skills to speak his mind, but lacks the social skills to know what is acceptable. So on our day trip to Birmingham this week, we had a few close encounters with the general public. First of all on the train, there was the person asleep by the window as Andrew went and sat on Granny’s lap on the neighbouring aisle seat: “That one’s asleep!”. Not anymore if you shout that at them. Then there was the girl eating her lunch across the aisle: “That girl’s got a sandwich!” Luckily this passenger thought his observation was rather cute and laughed it off. And then there was the man with the Mohican hair in the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery tea room: “That’s funny hair!” Well that’s what we were all thinking but only a toddler would air his views with such volume and openness.

One of the best bits about going to Birmingham (from Coventry) on the train, if you’re a plane-mad 3 year old that is, is the view of the airport runway and terminals on the way. On the way there, he spotted that big tower that controls the air traffic and exclaimed excitedly: “Look, it’s the remote control tower!” I find this interesting linguistically – he’s obviously heard us say remote control as well as just control for the thing you zap channels with on the TV, and I presume he’s also applied this to the tower that he’s heard us call the control tower. On the way back from our day trip, I spotted the airport first (go me!)…

Me: Look Andrew, there’s a plane over there, at the airport.

Andrew: Ooooh, it might be Fireflash! 

Yet another Thunderbirds reference, this is our world at the moment.

In last week’s wot so funee? post, I shared lots of foodie funees. This week there were fewer, and here’s the first and probably funniest… To set the scene, we were having a bit of rough and tumble play, which usually involves me getting down on the floor and getting sat/trampled on by the boys. At one point I stuck my leg out and Andrew sat on it like he does with Daddy or male grandparents sometimes, expecting me to lift him up and down as if he were riding a horse. I can’t actually manage that these days with his weight, but he accepted a compromise – me chanting the rhyme ‘ride a cock horse’ instead. So I recited the rhyme all the way up to the last line, and thought I’d pause to see if Andrew could say the key word. Here’s how it turned out…

Me: …with rings on her fingers and bells on her toes, she shall have……

Andrew: PASTA!

Me: [giggling] erm, I don’t think she will have pasta, can you remember the word that comes here in the rhyme?… she shall have……

Andrew: PIZZA!

Me: [laughing] I don’t think it’s any kind of food actually

Andrew: err raisins?

Me: Still food

Andrew: errr….curry?

Me: nevermind. It’s MUSIC, she shall have MUSIC wherever she goes!

Andrew: Aaaahhh

We’ve all had various symptoms of a cold this past week or so, including a sore, froggy throat for Andrew. He’s generally not one to let a bit of illness get him down, but one afternoon after his nap he was very groggy. So Granny suggested that he might like a special chocolate milkshake to help his poorly throat, which of course he downed in no time. But then he caught on, and even when he was clearly feeling better, he tried to milk it (pun intended) and get more chocolatey drinks by pulling a sad face and insisting that he was poorly. This came to a head one evening just after bath, which is always supervised by Daddy.

Andrew: Can I have a milkshake please Daddy? I’m poorly [sad face :(]

Daddy: I’m not sure that you’re really that poorly anymore Andrew. Shall we ask Mummy to see if she thinks it’s a good idea.

Andrew: OK!….[walks to top of stairs and shouts down to the kitchen]….Mummy! Can I have a milkshake please?….[walks back to bathroom]….Mummy says I can have a milkshake!

Daddy: Really?!

Andrew: Yes!

What Andrew failed to realise is that Daddy knew I was in our bedroom feeding Joel. Got to give him points for being clever enough to try and play us off against each other like that. But it didn’t win him any milkshakes this time.

For a just turned 3 year old, Andrew is quite adept at letters of the alphabet, and enjoys reading letters on anything and breaking down words into sounds. He’ll quite often come out with the phrase ‘A for Apple’ or whatever it is that he’s referring to – “B for Ball”, “J for Jumper”, “M for Mummy”….even “CH for cheese” (recognising that ‘ch’ is a sound that’s made up of 2 letters) and the classic “T for ‘tato”. Had to laugh at that one, but I know it’s normal – he’s picking up the stressed syllable as that’s what most English words start with, just a shame that potato doesn’t.

In a previous wot so funee post I described how Andrew likes to make up adjectives to stick on the end of the phrase ‘it’s a bit…’. This week’s offerings on this front include the following. When referring to Daddy’s new coat that we bought him one day as a belated birthday present (he said he wanted to think about exactly what type he wanted for his new job and commute), Andrew said: “It’s a bit coaty….and it’s a bit cosy!” That’s very true. When referring to a mini table football ball with the classic hexagon pattern, Andrew said: “It’s got blacky bits and whitey bits.” Or you could just say it’s got black bits and white bits, could you not?

To end with, I have something that’s rather cute as well as funny. One of his latest phrases, as I wrote last week, is “I like you, Mummy/Daddy/Grandad/Granny etc.” This week he came out with a beautiful one: “I like you Joel, you’re my best friend!” Awwww 🙂

Wot So Funee?