Red submarine and nocular gifts – wot so funee?

I don’t seem to have noted down so many funee moment this week. I don’t think it’s because there were fewer, I think I just got out of the habit of writing lots down over the Easter break. But here’s what I have on offer from the hilarious world of a preschooler and his toddler brother this week….

Andrew has become quite interested in the various surfaces that cover the ground at playgrounds in parks. The ones near us are either sand or that squishy astroturf type stuff that’s soft to land on though gets everything covered in salt. But recently we visited a park a bit further away that has those dark brown bits of soft wood on the ground. Andrew asked what was on the floor, so we said that it was bark chipping. He took it in, and a few minutes later he declared that he liked the “bark chicken” on the floor.

When we were on holiday before Easter, we found ourselves in the inevitable National Trust gift shop. Until now, Andrew has always chosen a bouncy ball as his souvenir treat, particularly when Granny and Grandad are with us, because they started a mini tradition of buying him one at NT shops. But this time Andrew was rather taken by these weird rubbery neon creatures that were called caterpillars on the tag, but looked more like a millipede with lots of legs to us. So that’s what we called it. But all the consonants were a bit of a mouthful for Andrew – he finds ‘l’ quite hard still when there are other consonants to make in a word, it is a bit of a different sound to make in the mouth compared to others we have in English – so he decided to call it a “lilypede” whilst he tried to master the word millipede.

Andrew has a bit of a thing about having no clothes on at the moment – he loves it, and finds any excuse he can to shake them off and go bare. He also likes to run to the door whenever the bell goes, so a fair few postmen, delivery guys and general door knockers get a lovely surprise (enough to scare away any cold callers 😉 ) One of his excuses to start stripping clothes off is if they are at all wet, even just a few drops. And this is what happened one day when he was eating cereals for breakfast with just his pants and t-shirt on. I saw him starting to pull off the pants, so asked why. His response was a loud and indignant: “I just don’t like milk in my pants!!” Fair enough I guess, nobody likes milk in their pants now do they!

A while ago I blogged about the habit that he had gotten into of taking random things to bed with him. This phase passed at some point, but he still occasionally likes to pick up  objects that I don’t think of as particularly good bedtime hugging material. For example one morning this week I found him with 2 mini plastic golf flags from a toy golf set that he plays with outside. I have no idea how they came to be there!

Although Andrew’s speech is very understandable for his age, he still of course makes learner mistakes. Tricky tenses often catch him out, like when he explained that “I didn’t went through that door, I went through this door!” It makes perfect sense really, especially when ‘went’ was coming up in the next part of the sentence too. ‘Might’ can be tricky too, so earlier I heard him say “I might can do a standing-up wee” (he can do it, I think it was just that the toilet at the garden centre soft play was a bit too high for him).

Joel is starting to sign quite a bit now – his favourites are bird, aeroplane and Granny and Grandad. He’s understanding so much of what we say, even if he can’t say anything yet in speech. Of course we’re giving him lots of praise when he signs, and Andrew then points out that he can do the signs too. Of course you can Andrew, you’re 3 and can talk! He’s also taken to telling me what the French and/or German word is for what Joel is signing, to try and really impress me and get one up on lil’ bro 😉

And finally for this week, a random bit of speech that he just came out with the other day whilst we were eating breakfast together. He’d been sitting in silence, eating his Weetabix minis and looking like he was pondering something.

Andrew: When you grow up Mummy, you can have a red submarine

Me: Really?

Andrew: Yes, Grandad will buy it for you!

Me: Really?

Andrew: Yes, and we will buy a nocular for Grandad!

Me: Hmmm….right…..?!

Nocular is ‘binoculars’ by the way – he likes looking through Grandad’s and saw that you could buy them from one of Grandad’s bird watching magazines. And he’s into the Yellow Submarine at the moment, so I’m guessing the submarine reference is something to do with that. Young minds are hilarious!

Wot So Funee?

The ducks don’t work – wot so funee?

We’ve had a bit of a break from wot so funee? posts over Easter and then last week when all I blogged about nappies for Resuable Nappy Week. As I’m getting back to normal on the blog this week, it seems only right to write up the best of the funees from the past few weeks.

I’ve written before about thhe fact that Andrew says yesterday for anything in the past and tomorrow for anything in the future. Fair enough, he’s a bit young still to be understanding the concept of weeks, months etc. But recently he’s had a thing about saying “this year”, which I think is related to when we explain to him that this year he is 3, but next year he will be 4. So we’ve had: “It’s quite a sunny day this year” and “I want Granny and Grandad to come home this year” – I presume he’s just thinking logically that it must mean ’now’, from when we say it, though he does know ’today’ and mainly uses that but ’this year’ creeps in too.

We quite often go to the local park on bin day, which, apart from being a pain to get the buggy through the gap between wheelie bins and garden fences on the pavement, means we get a running commentary on what the bins are like from our little chatterbox. He has quite rightly noticed that some are smaller than others on one particular road that we walk along – “Those are children bins and those are grown-up bins!” Yes that’s right Andrew, a whole family of bins line up on this street every Monday morning!

When we were on holiday with his four grandparents, Andrew was keen to do lots of activities with them. This included wanting to take some pictures with Grandad’s camera. As Grandad knelt down to take a photo of a pretty flower in the park, Andrew asked “Can I have a do?” No that isn’t a typo – he asked for a do rather than a go. Which to be fair to him, makes total sense, because taking photos is something that we ‘do’ rather than ‘go’ anywhere with. He hasn’t quite grasped the phrase ‘to have a go’, where ‘go’ is a noun not a verb like he’s used to.

Having studied several other languages, I’ve often thought that I’m glad I learned English natively as a child – it’s just so full of irregularities and peculiarities! We take it for granted as adult speakers of a language that we know these, but they can be really confusing to a learner, whether child or adult. One of these irregularities Andrew demonstrated perfectly when we were feeding the ducks and other birdlife down at the shores of Derwent Water on holiday…

Adult (I can’t remember who exactly): Look there are geese and ducks here Andrew.

Andrew: Aha!

A few minutes later….

Me: Watch that goose! Don’t go too close to him, he looks nasty!

Andrew: It’s not a goose, it’s a geese!

Me: I know, that’s so confusing!

And I proceeded to try and explain that it was one goose and two/three/more geese. Stupid English!

Then there was the time on another day of our holiday that he toddled off with Grandad to go and feed the ducks some duck food that we’d bought earlier in the week. We were between Rydal Water and Grasmere next to a small river that had a few ducks hanging around on it. But when they came back, Andrew was most disappointed because the ducks there didn’t want any of his special food: “the ducks don’t work here!” I mean come on, what were they playing at? Surely any self-respecting duck would want to eat some food wielded by an enthusiastic 3 year old, wouldn’t they?

As I’ve written before, no wot so funee? post would be complete without a foodie funee or two. Both boys would probably say that pasta is their favourite food. Joel can’t talk yet, though he’s very into signing at the moment, but the non-verbal cues that he gives me are very clear, i.e. shove it in fistfuls at a time until his cheeks are stuffed like a hamster and he can’t chew it down fast enough! I whipped up a quick pasta and cheese dish one lunchtime, like I often do (to call it a ‘dish’ is a little OTT, it’s just pasta mixed with grated cheese until it melts). Andrew was very impressed with what I served up in front of him, and when he tried to pick some up with his fork, a big clump of pasta came up with the fork: “Look, the pasta is cheesing together!” I thought that was quite an ingenious way of describing it actually.

Andrew has been a bit fussy with fruit and veg recently, though he did eat 4 pears today – he has a bit of a thing about this fruit, he gets his 5 a day, it’s just almost all pear! But I’m trying to be persistent with raisins on his breakfast cereal, which he used to always have until he got fussy with it a few weeks ago. So I asked the usual one morning…

Me: Would you like some raisins Andrew?

Andrew: No, I don’t like the dead ones!

Right…. wot so funee about that?

Wot So Funee?

Don’t get Thunderbirds wrong! – wot so funee?

As I sit and start to type this post, it’s pouring with rain outside. To be fair, it hasn’t been too rainy recently, but it’s making up for it today. This seems a good point to start with a funee moment from when the boys were at the park with Daddy at the weekend. Andrew was standing on the ground and Joel was just above him on the climbing frame, looking down. Andrew looked up to the sky and said: “Is it raining Daddy?” And Daddy’s (honest) reply was: “No Andrew, it’s just Joel dribbling on your head!” This is quite normal for Joel – copious amounts of dribble are often seen escaping from his mouth, hence the need for mummy-made super absorbent dribble bibs.

As usual, we’ve been spending quite a bit of time in the garden this past week, especially when I was ill and it was the easiest thing to entertain the boys with, simply by opening the door and letting them run off steam without too much effort from me. Andrew is very into the game pictured here, though this was taken after Joel had knocked it down and put golf balls in some of the holes – little brothers can be SO annoying! Andrew has heard us say the name of the game quite a bit, but the other day he asked if we could play it before I mentioned any names…

Andrew: “Can we play forget 4 please?”

Me: “Forget 4??”

Andrew: “No wait…. cadet 4?”

Me: “Ah I think you mean CONNECT 4 Andrew!” 🙂

IMG 1785

The trees are starting to be colourful again, so we’ve been talking about spring and what this means in terms of tree life cycles. Granny and Grandad’s garden has a lovely (except when it sheds all its petals in one go) magnolia tree, which is currently making the lawn look like it’s been hit by a freak snow storm. To try and cheer me up when I was ill, Andrew came up to me and kindly offered me a petal: “Look, here’s a blossom for you Mummy! There’s lots of blossoms here.” Aw, cute that he thinks one petal is one blossom rather than blossom being the collective noun.

No wot so funee? post from me would be complete without a foodie funee (or several). Andrew often asks what’s for tea these days, and I get met with various reactions depending on my answer. Here’s what happened one day this week…

Andrew: “What we having for tea?”

Me: “Casserole Andrew.”

Andrew: “Oh…… Hmm…. I do like roll!” *moves hand around in a gesture the shape of a swiss roll* (I wish I’d got a video of the hand bit – that really made the funee at the time!)

There’s been a new cereal in the cupboard this week – ‘Copters’ by Kelloggs Coco Pops. Andrew of course thinks these are amazing because (a) they look like helicopter blades and (b) they turn the milk chocolatey which he can drink with a straw after he’s eaten the cereals. He sometimes has a bit of trouble remembering the shortened name though (he can say helicopter fine), so a few mornings he has asked for “hocters”.

I’ve mentioned several times before that Andrew (along with his brother) is very active. When he was tearing around the living room crazily the other day, Granny asked him: “Where so you get all your energy from? Can I have some?” His response was: “From a doctor!” Aha, now we know the secret – quick, let’s all go to this doctor for a boost! Of course it might also help that Andrew has access to secret Thunderbird powers. Like when he attaches two small mole cuddly toys to himself, holding them underneath his arms, and these become his super powerful engines that blast him like a rocket around the house. Yes, we’re still mad about Thunderbirds and rockets, no change there.

In fact he now thinks of himself as so clued up on Thunderbirds that he has the right to tell us off when we don’t get it right. One of Grandad’s favourite little sayings at the moment is ‘don’t get X wrong’, which apparently comes from Alan Partridge (who I believe said ‘don’t get Bond wrong’). Grandad uses it in the context of anything that is said wrongly – so he replaces X with whatever it might be. Of course Andrew, being the little sponge that he is, had soaked this one up without us knowing, that is until one evening this week when it became quite clear… The boys have a ‘routine’ for going up to bath, which (surprise, surprise) also includes Thunderbirds! Andrew pretends to be one of the Thunderbird rockets/vehicles and he assigns one to Joel too, then they each blast off upstairs in the manner of the chosen rocket. Except one evening Daddy got it mixed up, and called Joel Thunderbird 1 when he’d been assigned Thunderbird 3. Cue Andrew… “No! Don’t get Thunderbirds wrong!!” And it was said with intonation just like Grandad/Alan. We all creased up with laughter 🙂

And finally for this week, we have a lovely piece of art work from the budding young artist Andrew. After dinner one day he got down from the table whilst Joel was just finishing off his food. We could see that he was drawing something on his easel with chalk. When he stepped away we could see the finished design – ta da! Then I asked what it was. His reply (in a very ‘well don’t you know?’ kind of tone: “a banana!” Of course, I can see it now, a banana, silly me! (?!?)

Banana

Wot So Funee?