When will I stop breastfeeding? – #KBBF2013

I don’t know the answer to this, only my boys do. From early on in Andrew’s life, I said that I wanted him to self-wean rather than me leading. In general I’ve taken a very baby-led approach to parenting, letting them settle into their own rhythms and not setting a routine – though Joel has had to conform a bit more than Andrew did, as his older brother’s pattern (that was drawn on a blank slate) was already set, but he seems to have been easy-going enough to cope with this. Breastfeeding is one aspect of my parenting, and an important one at that.

When I said that I would let Andrew self-wean, I didn’t think for one moment that he would still be enjoying mummy milk at nearly two and a half years old. I assumed that as my supply had been so rubbish in the first 6 months of his life, he would soon give up on me and that would be it. But as he quickly took to solid food, breastfeeding became something he did for comfort, not calories, and therefore it didn’t seem to matter to him that there wasn’t a huge amount. I then thought that he would self-wean during my pregnancy with Joel, again thinking that if my supply had been so rubbish before, then it would be even worse as the hormones caused it to dwindle in preparation for the new baby. I wrote a fair amount about this in my pregnancy diary posts every week on the blog (for example here and here). But he carried on, and it is still important for him now, nearly 8 months into his baby brother’s life.

My boys and I on our tandem nursing adventure
My boys and I on our tandem nursing adventure

Andrew doesn’t have loads of milk, and some days it’s more than others, but before bed every night he will have a cuddle and some mummy milk and then Daddy will read a story and say a prayer with him before leaving him in bed to drop off to sleep, which he is very good at. I think this regularity helps him unwind and know that it’s bedtime, and if it’s been a busy day, it’s one time that I know we can reconnect and talk about how the day has been for us.

Joel is now at the stage where solid food is taking up more and more of his daily calorie intake, which seems to be quite a lot as he’s also crawling everywhere so needs lots of energy. He too has taken to solid food well, and the amount of formula that I need to supplement with has gone down drastically in the past month or so. He’s feeding less in the daytime, and has most of his milk intake 5am-7am and 7pm-8pm, as well as a few small feeds here and there in the day alongside his solid food.

As with Andrew, I will let Joel decide himself when he wants to stop breastfeeding. There are some days when Tom (my husband) and I joke that at this rate Andrew will be feeding longer than Joel, mainly because Joel is in that stage of feeding quite a bit less now that he’s on solids so it doesn’t feel like I’m constantly feeding him any more and there is a big difference in how that feels to me.

Well done! You've found another hunt logo - you can enter the competition again at the bottim of this post.
Well done! You’ve found another hunt logo – you can enter the competition again at the bottom of this post.

When I look back at how breastfeeding started with Andrew, it’s hard to believe that we’ve ended up where we are – I have two boys who have healthy appetites and are still enjoying mummy milk. How on earth we ended up here I wonder with amazement, things could have turned out so differently. Before Andrew was born I had no idea that it was even possible to breastfeed a toddler, let alone through another pregnancy, and it didn’t even enter my head why anyone would want to do that. I guess if we hadn’t have hit problems and therefore found help through LLL, I might not have even learned that I don’t *have* to wean my baby at 6 months when they start eating more than milk, like all the prominent books and advertising would have us believe.

Everyone has their own breastfeeding goals, and what is right for one family is not the same as what is right for another family. Different mums and babies are ready to wean from breastfeeding at all sorts of different times and for different reasons. This is just our story. At one point I said I would be glad to get to 6 weeks, then I said I’d be glad to get to 6 months, then to 1 year, then through pregnancy, then to 6 months of another baby, then to whenever they both want to stop. My goals have shifted as I’ve lived with one and then two nurselings. I hope that anyone reading this is able to achieve their own breastfeeding goal, whatever that might be.

There’s still more time to enter the main competition of the scavenger hunt, with more than £1000 worth of prizes in the kitty. Just fill in the rafflecopter below! You can read more posts about breaastfeeding at the following blogs…

The Brick Castle

In the Playroom

Pea Musings

Faded Seaside Mama

Let’s Walk Together for a While

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Nominated: Best Pregnancy Blog in the MADs

A few days ago there was much excitement on twitter as the organisers of the MAD (Mum and Dad) blogger awards started to announce blogs which have so far been nominated in each category. As I saw the tweet for the Best Pregnancy Blog nominations come up on my feed, I thought I’d take a look, not because I thought my little blog would be on it, but because I’ve come across a few other pregnant bloggers and was curious to see if they were on there. Although I had been aware of the awards, I’m not really into asking for nominations, and I know a lot of my readers (who aren’t that numerous anyway compared to some blogs) aren’t bloggers themselves so probably wouldn’t be aware of the MADs. But to my astonishment my URL was listed! Someone must have liked my weekly bump diary enough to nominate me 🙂

In my very first blog post I talked about the reasons why I blog: primarily because I enjoy writing and wanted a place to do it regularly as well as writing one-off articles in parenting magazines published by charities (one of which I now edit), but also I like to see others read it and get something out of it – maybe it encourages them, makes them laugh (hmm maybe… if they share my slightly odd sense of humour), gives them a different perspective on something, or introduces them to something they’ve never heard of before. It is such an encouragement to know that my blog is being read and enjoyed. I often get comments from people I see face to face, saying how they liked my last post or found my post on such and such useful, and I get a few positive feedback comments on the blog, but I still think of my blog as quite small, by which I mean not very widely read. So to be nominated for an award, particularly in a category that I wrote regularly and enthusiastically on over this past year, gives me a great sense of achievement. I never set out to win anything, but it’s lovely to know that my writing is appreciated enough to be nominated.

So what happens now? Having checked out the MADs website, the nomination stage is still open until 18th February. After that the blogs with the most nominations will be shortlisted as finalists and then a winner will be voted on. Most of the voting is by bloggers, so being popular and widely read will help, but there will be one blog shortlisted in each category based on a panel of judges’ decision. I have no idea how much chance I have of getting through, but whatever happens, I’ll wear my ‘nominated’ badge with pride – look at it all colourful over there —>

Thank you to all of you who read my blog; without you it would just be me wittering on to myself!

MAD Blog Awards

Bump time lapse video

Click HERE to watch the video

I’ve been meaning to get round to this for a while, but it never quite seemed to get to the top of my list of things to do on the laptop whilst feeding – possibly because I thought cropping the pictures would require 2 hands on the track pad rather than the one that I’ve come accustomed to typing with. But in th end it turned out to be easier than I thought using just one hand.

So here is a video of my bump shots from week 17 to week 40, showing how it went from tiny to big, sped up from 23 weeks to just 7 seconds! I thought about taking a picture of me in this position holding baby after the birth, but once Joel arrived I completely forgot about this in all the busyness of having a new baby. I think it’s a pretty cool record of my pregnancy, and one day I can show it to my boys too.

It’s not just about feeling a bit icky first thing when you wake up!

This wasn’t what I expected to be writing about whilst sitting feeding my 5 week old baby; I thought I’d left it behind us when he was born. But with the news that the Duchess of Cambridge is pregnant but in hospital with “acute morning sickness”, I decided I had to write a quick post to try and spread the word that calling her condition “morning sickness”, even with the adjective “severe” or “acute”, trivialises what she is going through.

In both my pregnancies I suffered with nausea and vomiting. As I had this blog during my second pregnancy, I wrote about it in my pregnancy diary posts quite often in the first half of pregnancy: week 14, week 15, week 16, week 17, week 18, week 19. The graph below is taken from my week 15 post. The second pregnancy was slightly worse than the first in terms of how long the nausea went on for – I felt sick at some point in every day of it, even up to the night he was born. At first it was all day, yes that’s right, ALL DAY, worse in the evening, yes that’s right, the EVENing, but after about 20 weeks (out of 40) it started to just be in the afternoon and evening. Until about 15 weeks I was being sick several times a day, which eased to just a couple of times a day until about 20 weeks and then no actual vomiting just the constant nausea after that. It was similar timescales in my first pregnancy, except the nausea did wear off towards the very end – possibly because I had toddler to tire me out second time round, or because apparently it can get worse with successive pregnancies.

I did not enjoy being pregnant; I never got that ‘blooming’ feeling that people talk about. I never felt hungry – hunger just translated to nausea. I distinctly remember the first time I felt properly hungry again after each birth, and could enjoy a nice meal rather than just eating because I knew I had to. I just got through each day knowing that it would be worth it in the end, and it was. Of course that bit was easier second time around as I had Andrew as living proof right there in front of me (even if he was tiring to look after!) Nothing helped to relieve the nausea and vomiting – if I had a pound for every time someone asked me if I’d tried ginger I’d at least have made a healthy profit out of feeling so rubbish.

The statistician in me (the one who was taught all she knew during the PhD) understands that every ‘normal distribution’ is a curve – some lucky ladies are in the thin end at the left and suffer no or hardly any nausea and sickness (lucky them, she says gritting her teeth), some not-so-lucky ladies are around the peak of the curve and suffer nausea and sickness for about 14-15 weeks, and some unlucky ladies find themselves in the thin end at the right and get the nausea and sickness thing real bad and/or for ages. So far (week 15) I’m hanging around to the right of the peak, waiting to see whether I’ll slide any further down into the gloomy far-right of the curve, or whether I’ll be spared from the descent.

The nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (or NVP) had a big impact on daily life for both me and our family. When I was pregnant with Andrew, I had a week off work when the NVP first hit, and then was less productive at work for quite a while, taking several breaks, sometimes leaving early or working from home. Tom took care of everything around the flat, and we hardly saw each other as I would go to bed not long after he got in from work about 5.30pm. It surprised me how quickly the NVP came on – one day I was fine, and the next I woke up and was sick, thinking it would pass by the time I was dressed and ready, but it didn’t pass until many weeks later, like a constant tummy bug. So I completely understand how Kate could go from walking through Cambridge last Wednesday to lying in a hospital bed the following Monday.

When I was pregnant with Joel, I had a well-timed, but totally unplanned that way, week of annual leave from my then part-time job, which meant I could at least have a couple of days rest whilst Andrew was with the childminder. When I went back, I was again less productive, similar to the first time, and it was good timing with Easter week being at the height of the NVP and we went away with family so I could get lots of rest. However, the days I didn’t work were even harder, as I had Andrew to entertain. The groups we went to were in the morning, so most weeks I could just about manage to get us there and sit down whilst he played; then in the afternoon (I felt worse than in the morning), he would nap and I would spend that time flitting between lying down on the bed and having my head down the toilet. On a good day that would leave only an hour and a half or so to entertain him, usually with DVDs, until Tom got home, which is when I’d crawl into bed, though not always get off to sleep as the nausea was so bad. I do feel bad that Andrew had to put up with a less than with it mum then, just like I feel bad that I’m spending lots of time feeding Joel now, so he watches lots of DVDs and youtube. I guess that’s just part of having more than 1 child, and I always knew that it would be likely that I would get NVP again, but we decided it was better then than waiting longer, by which time he might not have been napping much and would need even more entertaining. Again, Tom was left to deal with everything around the flat, as well as this time looking after a toddler for every hour that he wasn’t working. Not particularly fun for any of us!

Now if that sounds bad enough, and I hope I’ve got the message across that it was, I actually count myself lucky! My mum suffered much more than that, being sick every day for two entire pregnancies, and a good friend of mine, Amanda over at the Family Patch also suffered very severe NVP with her son. Severe cases of NVP are actually called hyperemesis gravidarum or HG. This term is featured in some media reports of Kate’s pregnancy, but you have to search pretty deeply into them beyond the headlines, opening paragraphs and one-liners. “Morning sickness” gives the impression that it’s just about feeling sick first thing, and can lead to people who haven’t experienced moderate to severe NVP, even mums who have been pregnant themselves but not had these symptoms, wondering what all the fuss is about – can’t she just ‘get over it’? Amanda has written a very informative blog post as to why you can’t just ‘get over’ HG. My NVP wasn’t severe enough to call it HG, but it was certainly more than “morning sickness”.

It was hard enough coping with NVP in my relatively uneventful life, but I can’t imagine what it’s like having such severe HG and also being in the media spotlight. I feel so sorry for Kate, and wish her all the best, hoping that those caring for her can make the pregnancy as comfortable as possible. Before 12 weeks of pregnancy, the chances of something going wrong are still pretty high. I struggled with knowing this when feeling so awful, I was torn: do I tell people so that I don’t have to hide the NVP, or do I not tell in case I miscarry and have to go through telling people that? Again, in the media spotlight this must be an even harder decision, so I hate to think how Kate and William must have felt in making it. In the end we did what they have done and told people because it was too hard to hide any longer. This was more the case for my first pregnancy as I was working full-time in a big office, whereas second time I got away with telling fewer people before 12 weeks as I was working part-time and we’d moved offices to one where I was mostly in a room on my own, and on days I looked after Andrew I could avoid seeing lots of people.

I hope this post has helped show that “morning sickness” is a poorly (no pun intended) used term, and that NVP is a real condition to cope with that has a major impact on many pregnant mums and their families. Please share this, re-tweet it, or do whatever you can to help raise awareness. Thank you 🙂

Butternut squash risotto with pea and rosemary pesto: non-smelly cooking!

If you’ve been reading my blog for more than a few weeks, you probably know that since I was about 6 weeks pregnant, I haven’t been able to smell food cooking without feeling nauseous. Until about week 15, it wasn’t just nausea – I would be physically sick whenever I smelled it. I didn’t actually realise that it was the food cooking smell that was such a major trigger to my sickness until we went on holiday for a week when I was 10 weeks pregnant: one evening we went out for a meal, and although I didn’t stay long or eat anything except some bread at the pub, when I went back to the house where we were staying I felt better than I had been all week at that time in the evening – it dawned on me that nobody had cooked anything there that evening. Since we got back from that holiday, we’ve not cooked anything in the flat. Don’t feel too sorry for my boys though, because Tom gets a free cooked lunch at work (Cambridge colleges seem to look after their staff), and Andrew has one meal a day heated up from the freezer that were very helpfully cooked by Granny at her house 80 miles away 🙂

Yummy! And my tasters thought so too - Andrew even asked for more!

Until recently we’ve mainly been eating salad, bread, cooked meats, cheese etc. I realised a while ago that boiling things like pasta, potatoes, rice was OK, because it didn’t smell that bad – the main trigger seems to be anything frying in oil/fat, particularly meat but also veg, or anything roasting in oil/fat, again particularly meat but also veg. So we’ve been able to make simple pasta and potato salads and eat them cold. I also found out relatively recently that putting a pizza in the oven for just 5-10 mins (all it needs in our efficient oven) is bearable, I guess because all it’s doing is melting cheese and heating up rather than actually cooking it. The past few weeks I’ve been able to stand the smell of baking (cakes, biscuits, bread etc.) much more than before.

Pea and rosemary pesto ready to go in the risotto when the rice is done. I love the bright green colour from the peas.

In the past week or so I’ve been feeling more adventurous in terms of thinking of things that I could ‘cook’ that don’t smell – basically this means avoiding frying or roasting. So instead of eating just cold things, we’ve actually had some ‘cooked’ meals. One of the dishes I came up with was a risotto, and it went down very well with both my tasters (aka Tom and Andrew) so I thought I’d blog it, because it’s so quick and easy to do, and really does taste as good as something that requires more ingredients and proper cooking. I don’t add salt to any of our food, both for Andrew’s sake and because I’m not a big fan of even slightly salty food – but this risotto could be made with a stock cube if you’d prefer, by just adding it to the boiling water as the rice and squash boil. I prefer to get all the flavour from the peas, cheese and rosemary in the homemade pesto. The first time I made it I left it veggie, but the second time I added a tin of tuna, because since being pregnant I’ve been more concerned that I get enough protein. It would also work with pulses as protein – I often stick beans in veggie risottos to give them a source of protein.

Anyway, here’s the recipe….

Ingredients – serves 2 adults and a toddler

  • 1 medium butternut squash, skin off and cut into small-ish cubes
  • 1 large mug of rice (I just use long grain for risottos to save on the cost of risotto rice)
  • 100g frozen peas
  • 50g cheese (I used cheddar because I’m not sure I can have parmesan at the moment as all the packs in the supermarket said unpasteurised – I’d probably try parmesan when I’m not pregnant)
  • olive oil – a few glugs
  • handful of fresh rosemary (we’re lucky that we have some growing in pots on our balcony – it’s amazing what you can grown even if you live in a flat – we have tomatoes, herbs and lettuce)


  1. Place the squash cubes and rice in a large pan and add boiling water. Leave to boil for about 10 minutes, adding more boiling water if necessary once it starts to get absorbed into the rice.
  2. Meanwhile, cook the frozen peas in the microwave (or in a pan of boiling water). Once cooked, drain any excess water and place in a food processor. (I have one of those small whizzers, so I do half at a time).
  3. Chop the cheese into chunks and place in the food processor, along with the rosemary – remove the leaves from the stalky bits.
  4. Drizzle a glug or two of olive oil into the food processor.
  5. Whizz all the ingredients together until you have a smooth paste, adding more oil if necessary.
  6. Once the rice and squash are cooked, add the pesto to them and stir well to spread it around evenly. (If there is excess water in the pan, drain before adding the pesto, but it’s best to add a bit of water at a time to the rice and squash when they’re cooking, so you don’t end up with an excess in the first place.)
  7. Serve straight away. It also freezes well for another day – just make sure it’s thoroughly defrosted and heated through again.

Peanut butter cookies

A while ago (OK, quite a while ago, back in June!) I posted a recipe for cheese scones, and I talked about the reason why I decided on that recipe that particular day: I had 2 eggs to use up as they were on their use-by date. One of those eggs went in the scones, and the other I promised I would blog about later. Well, these peanut butter cookies are what the other egg went in! The idea for the cookies also came from the need to use something up that had been in the cupboard for a while. I usually like peanut butter, either in a sandwich or used in cooking (for example, I have a great and easy peanut butter curry recipe), but I went off it in early pregnancy as I didn’t feel like eating it when I was so sick. So we had a couple of jars (one smooth, one crunchy) open in the cupboard for quite a while. But as the sickness eased, I felt like I wanted to try it again, and it turned out I really quite fancied it then, I think because it’s quite savoury (at least the brand I buy is, with no added sugar like some).

I had heard something about avoiding peanuts in pregnancy though, so I looked this issue up in the NHS ‘Pregnancy’ book. The current advice is that eating peanuts as part of a balanced and varied diet in pregnant is fine, unless of course you are yourself allergic to them. It was once advised that pregnant mums should avoid eating peanuts if their baby’s immediate family had a history of allergies in general (such as asthma, eczema or food allergies). But the most recent research shows no clear evidence that eating or not eating peanuts affects the chances of the baby developing a peanut allergy. That advice sounds good enough to me, and as I was in the mood for something peanutty, the cookies were a good option.

I only put a small amount of sugar in, so they actually turned out more like savoury biscuits with the texture of a soft cookie than sweet cookies. I used some smooth and come crunchy peanut butter, so I was careful when I gave one to Andrew, checking each bit as I gave it to him for big chunks of peanut – it was fine though, as there were no big chunks. If I was making them just for myself, I’d probably go for all crunchy, to give the overall soft cookies a bit of a bite to them. But the smooth butter needed using up! The recipe is below – it’s a really quick and easy one to do.


  • 100g margarine
  • 100g peanut butter (I used half smooth half crunchy because that’s what needed using up!)
  • 100g self-raising flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 50g brown sugar
  • 1 egg


  1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC (fan), and line a couple of baking sheets with greaseproof paper.
  2. Cream the margarine, peanut butter and sugar in a bowl until smooth and fluffy.
  3. Beat in the egg until smooth.
  4. Add the flour and baking powder, and stir until well combined.
  5. Dollop teaspoonfuls of mixture on the baking sheets, spread well apart as they will expand.
  6. Bake in the oven for about 15 mins, or until lightly golden and still quite soft.
  7. Allow to cool, during which time they will firm up.
  8. Remove from baking sheets and store in an airtight container – though they go dry quite quickly, so I would recommend eating them asap!

And then there were four….

A while ago I wrote a short post just in case anyone was missing me on here, because I knew I wasn’t writing as often as I once was. I talked about a couple of projects – one was my editorial work for my local NCT branch magazine, and the other wasn’t quite ready to be announced back then. Well the time has finally come when I’d like to share with you our news (in case you hadn’t guessed already from my not-so-cryptic clue, or seen on Facebook)….. I’m pregnant! That’s right, at the end of October, our three-person family will expand to four 🙂 We’re very excited, and very much looking forward to the new arrival.

Isn't he/she cute?!
Baby Cumming (2) at 13 weeks and 2 days

This scan photo was taken earlier this week, at 13 weeks and 2 days (according to size estimations from the scan itself), giving us a due date of 30th October. As I remember feeling at our first scan with Andrew, this was an amazing experience, because it was the first time we saw a proper picture of our baby (I say proper, since we actually had a scan at 9 weeks this time – but baby still looked like a prawn then – because of a mix up with dates and communication between our community midwife and the hospital ultrasound department procedures…. gotta love the NHS!) Until this week, all I had to ‘prove’ I really did have a real, live and kicking baby growing inside me were a couple of pregnancy tests (we did two just to really believe them) and awful sickness. Seeing baby move on screen, and its little heart beating, was a lovely reassurance that all was fine.

I’m going to try and write a kind of pregnancy diary on the blog, hopefully weekly or thereabouts, to keep anyone interested up to date with how things are going. I’ve even created a new category called ‘pregnancy and breastfeeding’. Although I’ve talked about breastfeeding before on here, it’s always just come under ‘mum-hood’. But as it is one of the biggest things on my mind in this pregnancy so far, I feel it could really do with its own space. I have a feeling there’s going to be a lot I want to share on that front – all the things I know now having struggled through the first 6 months of breastfeeding Andrew, but having come out the other side feeling very positive, making it to toddler breastfeeding, and now even breastfeeding in pregnancy! Eek, how did I ever get to be doing that?! (I feel that needs a post in its own right some time.)

So, as a first addition to this pregnancy diary, how would I summarise the first 13 weeks? That’s pretty easy really: sickness, nausea and exhaustion. Not very positive, sorry! As many of you will know from your own or friends’ experience, the first trimester (and beyond) of pregnancy can be pretty awful for mum, and leave you feeling rubbish at a time when you expected to be feeling over the moon. Since about week six, I’ve been feeling constantly nauseous, and been sick several times a day, although this week less often, so I’m hoping that actually being sick is wearing off, and that at some point the constant nausea will too (it did at about 20 weeks with Andrew).

This time round I can’t say that it’s been any easier than last, even though I now have Andrew as living proof that all the sickness really will be worth it in the end. In some ways it’s been even harder than last, probably because I’ve been more tired through looking after Andrew, and I can’t just take things at my own pace. It did help that I had a (totally co-incidental, not planned that way) week of annual leave from work in March just as I started to be really sick, and another week and a half at Easter, when I was very grateful to our amazing families who gave us a week of rest when we all went on holiday together.

Like last time, I’ve learned coping strategies for getting through the day, like what to try and eat when, and what to do and avoid doing (for example, rest as much as possible and not be near any food that’s being cooked!) If anyone wants to suggest ginger – been there, done that, doesn’t help. I’m wearing seabands – not that I think they make much (any?!) difference, but I don’t want to take them off and potentially feel even worse than I do, it’s just not worth the risk. My bedtime has ranged from about 5.30pm when Tom gets in from work, to 8pm when Andrew is asleep; even if I don’t get to sleep straight away due to the nausea, at least I’m lying down in a darkened room.

Maybe this is all a bit too much information? Well the reason I decided to be so up front about this is that I think pregnancy sickness is something that there could be more support for, rather than something mums-to-be feel they just have to ‘put up with’ alone. A friend of mine and fellow blogger, Amanda over at the Family Patch, is doing great things to promote awareness of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP), and its most severe form, Hyperemesis gravidarum, which she suffered from whilst carrying her son. I totally agree with her that more can be done to support mums who are battling with feeling so awful and isolated, and also to research what causes NVP and how best to help. It is so good to know that I’m not alone in this, and although that doesn’t get rid of the NVP problem, it does help to try and deal with it on a daily basis. I’m also very grateful that Tom is very supportive, not only by keeping on top of all the housework that I haven’t been able to do, but also listening to me whinge about how rubbish I’m feeling.

Having written this, I don’t want to detract from what is a very positive and exciting time for us. Despite the sickness, I’m feeling very happy that I’m soon going to be a mum of two little ones 🙂 This really is a dream come true, and something that I didn’t take for granted would just happen. Since I gave birth to Andrew, I have felt increasingly as though my main role in life is being mum; although I returned to work part-time when he was 9 months old, I have known since then that I would take a break from paid work either at the end of my contract, or if and when we were blessed with another baby (which turns out to be 2 months before the end of my contract), to look after our family. I’m looking forward to sharing more about how things progress with this pregnancy over the weeks, and I’m sure future diary posts will be full of good times. Exciting!