Curls – word of the week

At the very end of last week, on Sunday evening, we gave Joel his first hair cut. The curls were becoming quite a mullet at the back, and the front was starting to come as low as his eye brows, so I thought it was time to trim it so that it grows thicker with more shape. I remember cutting Andrew’s hair for the first time, but I’d only just started blogging and didn’t post on here about it. He was quite a bit younger, as he was born with lots more hair than Joel was and it was long enough to be getting in his eyes before he was 1.

When I first cut Andrew’s hair, I’d not long started cutting Daddy’s hair regularly – with Cambridge barber prices so extortionate, we looked into getting a pair of clippers and when I found out how easy they made it for me to cut his hair, we never looked back and have saved ourselves a small fortune in hair cutting bills. So I wasn’t used to cutting hair when I first cut Andrew’s, and I was a little nervous as to how to do it and what it would look like if I went wrong! I soon got into the swing of it after a few times though, and now I whizz over it with the clippers just like I do with Daddy’s. It’s really thick – I’m quite jealous of it really – but the clippers are great because they shorten and even it out in thickness just with the same length guide all over his head.

Andrew hair Collage

So when I came to cut Joel’s for the first time, I was much more confident, and I went straight to using the clippers all over, which took the curls off and made it look much neater, back and front. The hardest thing was getting him to keep his head straight, but with a few adults, some smarties and a short DVD on the phone, we managed it. Andrew was just like this when I first started cutting his hair, but he soon got used to it and now knows that the stiller he stays, the quicker the job is done. And besides, with the clippers it’s hard to go wrong, even if he moves at the wrong time.

Joel hair Collage

In a way it was sad to see Joel’s baby curls go, but I’ve kept them, to go in the keepsake box where Andrew’s are when it comes out of storage. Now he looks like a little boy rather than a baby, though as he’s been walking since before his first birthday, it’s hard to think of him as a real baby anyway. This week I’ve been looking at his hair whenever I’ve taken some pictures of the boys, and thinking wow, where did my baby go? But it’s exciting to see him growing up, even if that means losing the baby features.

Can you remember your baby’s first hair cut? Do you still have the first curls?

Linking up with word of the week


The Reading Residence


Pregnancy diary: week 37 – full-term baby and antenatal class 2

Well we’ve reached a full-term pregnancy, which is a nice feeling! If baby had been born last week, he/she would still have been classed as premature, but if he/she is born this week (hypothetically, there are no signs yet) then he/she would be classed as a ‘full-term’ baby (for the Cambridge peeps who might be reading, this is nothing to do with the 8 weeks of intensive work that’s just begun round here!) In terms of my hopes for the birth, this means I can go ahead with either the Birth Centre or a home birth, neither of which would have been possible before 37 weeks, because the medical teams would have wanted me in hospital with all the equipment for helping baby and me recover from an earlier than expected birth. Now I really think that the end of pregnancy feels near, even though I don’t know exactly how near – anywhere between tonight (unlikely) and about 4.5 weeks time (hopefully not).

Earlier in the week I had the slightly annoying experience of living with two aching arms, after I was jabbed once in the left for my flu vaccine and once in the right for my whooping cough vaccine. The flu jab is now routine for all pregnant women, so although I’m not usually eligible as I don’t have any health conditions that would warrant it, I had one this year and two winters ago when I was pregnant with Andrew, which was also around the time when swine flu was still in general public awareness. The whooping cough vaccine is not normally routine for pregnant women, but there has recently been an increase in the number of cases in this country, particularly in young babies, who don’t receive the immunisation until their series of jabs at 8,12 and 16 weeks old. By vaccinating pregnant women, their babies will be born with immunity to this disease, which can kill young children.

Annoying as aching arms are, at least I know this minor discomfort is worth it for the protection of baby (and me!) against nasty illnesses. It’s interesting how I used to hate needles of any sort, particularly blood tests but also vaccinations, and would get very nervous and distressed about having them. Since my first pregnancy and now this one, I’ve totally got over that, and although I wouldn’t say I enjoy going to get these things done, it really doesn’t bother me like it used to. I think now that I’ve experienced the pain of labour, these short sharp pains of a needle going through my skin just seem so bearable. It’s funny what having kids does to you on so many levels!

Also, one thing that did help me get through the jabs this time was the thought that afterwards I was going to have a whole hour to myself of sitting down being pampered at the hairdressers. I rarely get my hair cut these days. Before Andrew came along I’d go maybe 4 times a year, but the last time I went was 10 months ago, before he was even 1 year old, and the time before that was about 9 months previously when he was a couple of months old, so I’m averaging about once a year at the moment, and I can’t see this changing in the near future. Not that it particularly bothers me, but it is nice to have that little bit of me-time and have my hair cut back into some semblance of a ‘style’ rather than it constantly being scooped back and tied up.

Not long to go now until bump will be baby!

Apart from these couple of things worth mentioning at the start of the week, the biggest thing on my mind was the second antenatal class that I did last night. It was lovely to see all the mums I met last week, except one who unfortunately couldn’t make it, and continue to get to know each other and build friendships. The evening was split into a few parts. First we talked through the stages of labour, to refresh our minds on it. The teacher had some cards with diagrams of a baby in the womb which showed a labour progressing from start to finish. Our job was to put them in order, based on our knowledge of labour. Between us we got them right, except for one which was a bit tricky and apparently fools most classes she teaches! This was a great way to go through what we might expect to happen, although as our different stories of birth with our first child testify, not everyone (in fact hardly anyone in our group) has such a ‘textbook’ birth. Mine was much faster than many, and my waters broke at the start rather than somewhere around the middle; others had ended up with complications and needed a caesarian, so they didn’t experience the baby coming all the way down the birth canal as the pictures showed.

A few things came up whilst we were talking about labour that we ended up discussing whilst we were thinking about them, like the start of breastfeeding (and how mum’s milk may come in later if she’s had a complicated delivery with lots of intervention), and these off-shoots of discussion were really important too. We then carried on conversations about various things in a tea/coffee (for me, water) break, including the fact that my baby could be born anytime soon and I might not make it to next week’s class. I’m hoping we will, as Tom is also attending that one and I’d like him to meet the other dads.

After the break we split into groups to discuss three different types of birth: water birth, home birth and caesarian birth. The mums in each group had either had or were planning the type of birth being discussed, so it was useful to get different perspectives on each type. I wasn’t sure whether I should sit in the water birth or home birth camp, but in the end went for the water birth one, because this is my main plan, with home birth as the back-up. Although I didn’t quite deliver Andrew in the water, I was in the pool until a few minutes before delivery, whereas the other ladies in the group hadn’t had any experience of birthing in a pool, so I hope that sharing my experience was positive for them – they seemed to like the idea after I talked about my experience and didn’t give the impression that I’d put them off at least. Once we’d discussed in groups, we came back together and the teacher went through the main points of each, giving time for us to ask specific questions if we wanted. Overall this was a very positive exercise; I now feel I know enough about both potential types of birth that I’m hoping for, and also more about how a caesarian isn’t the end of the world if it did have to come to that.

The final stint of the evening was left to a bit of brainstorming about potential issues that could arise between siblings. I hadn’t thought about this being covered in the class, but actually it’s a really good idea to try and preempt things that might come up between Andrew and the new baby, so that we can put strategies in place or at least think how we might deal with things before they escalate. We do have one of the smallest age gaps in the group, so I’m hoping we won’t have major issues, but it’s good to be prepared and hear others’ thoughts on this. The idea was that we came up with some potential issues last night, and then we’ll discuss them along with possible solutions next week when our partners are there with us too.

One thing that did come out of the discussion was getting a present for the baby to ‘give’ to the toddler after they are born. I’d thought about this a little before when someone else mentioned it, but I have to admit it went out of my mind until last night! One suggestion was a doll, so that the toddler can copy what mum is doing with the baby. I think this is a good idea, but my initial search for dolls at the local shops this morning wasn’t very fruitful – most were too pink, many were too fancy with loads of ‘functions’ like talking/weeing/pooing etc. (I want something simple), others looked really odd or a little freaky, and some were just downright too expensive (who would pay £50 for a plastic doll?!) So I’m now on the lookout for a doll online, hoping to find something quite plain, dressed in blue/purple/neutral colours, and which is quite cheap.

I’ll probably be back with another instalment of my pregnancy diary at 38 weeks next week, but it’s not something I can bank on. Once the baby is born there won’t be as much time for blogging (if any?!), so the days of writing posts this long are numbered. In some ways this is a bit sad, but I’m also excited about entering into a new stage, being a mum of two little ones who will keep me very busy but who will also reward me with many joys. I hope you as readers will also enjoy the transition as the blog moves into this new stage with us.