Apple day at Burwash Manor – #CountryKids

A few weeks ago we saw an advert for an Apple Day at Burwash Manor near Cambridge that was happening last weekend. We’ve not been to an apple day before, but Tom googled it and found that it’s quite a common tradition for places to put one on. The posters said that there would be various things on there throughout the day, including mini steam train rides and tractor rides, as well as apple related things like stalls selling apples, cider and watching apples be juiced. We knew that the non-apple stuff that was mentioned would be appealing to Andrew, and the entrance fee seemed reasonable for a family, so we headed off to be there for when it opened.

We parked in a muddy field – when I realised that this really wasn’t the weekend to be without our toddler sling that was away to be repaired, and we had to get the buggy out. It wasn’t so muddy when we got to the main field though, and then there was a path too around the toy/craft/food shops bit. The first thing that Andrew saw was the tractors, which were having a ‘ploughing contest’ first thing in the morning. He and Daddy nipped up the field to have a closer look, whilst I waited at the car for Joel to wake up from his nap.

Apple day 1

As we walked up the field towards the entrance, Andrew spotted the next amazing treat in store: the mini steam train that was chugging up the field on its own little track. So he ran off in front of us and, although we called him back, the ladies on the gate had to stop him from running right in without us! We explained that we needed to pay them, and he was happy when he got a sticker to show that we’d paid. Of course he had to have a go on the train before we did anything else. This was in fact the same train that he had been on at another country fair a few months ago – it’s a local enthusiast who has his own portable mini steam railway who goes to event like this and charges a not unreasonable amount for rides.

Apple day 2

There were a few other fairground type rides, but at double the cost of a train ride, we persuaded him that after we’d looked around some other things he could have another train ride. So we headed off to the other parts of the event. The next thing that Andrew spotted was a playground with swings, slides and climbing frames. Of course we then spent a good amount of time there, although it had been raining so the boys got quite wet – they didn’t seem to mind though, and I always carry spare clothes for these kind of situations.

After we’d exhausted the playground, we headed off towards the courtyard where there are little craft, toy and food shops, and on the day there were also food and drink stalls selling fancy cups of coffee and up-market burgers and sausages etc. We had a browse of a few shops, and spent quite a bit of time in the toy shop because they rather handily had some toys on display that you can play with, including a train set!

Apple day 3

When we came out of that shop, we saw that a steel band was about to start playing in the courtyard. They played some classic songs and the music sounded very happy. Quite  a crowd gathered, and there were several young children standing at the front, and most of them joined in with some dancing that a few of them started off. Andrew danced a bit, though he seemed too concentrated on being fascinated with the music to want to dance that much.

Apple day 4

We then headed back towards the field near the entrance, where they were now in full swing juicing apples at one of the stands. This was fun to watch, and Andrew was again fascinated by the machine that took apples in at one end and out came juice at the other. We watched that for quite a while! Opposite this stand were some stalls selling apples and local honey. We tried a few different varieties of apple and then decided to buy some to take home with us. When asked which apple he liked best to take home, Andrew replied with “pear”! So he got a few pears to take home – to be fair, he loves pears, and although he eats apples, pears are a definite favourite at the moment.

Apple day 5

As he had been a good boy, we allowed Andrew his second train ride as promised, and after this we headed out back to the car, passing the tractors on our way, which were still ploughing for the competition. We’d hoped that we could have a tractor ride, but it seemed that these must have been scheduled for later in the afternoon, and we felt as though we’d done what there was for young children and they were getting tired.

It was a fun morning out and we’re glad that we got to experience an apple day for the first time.

Linking up with the fab #CountryKids linky over at Coombe Mill’s blog 🙂

Country Kids from Coombe Mill Family Farm Holidays Cornwall

Rock a bye penguin – wot so funee?

Living with a toddler is like having our very own comedy show every day. The stuff he comes out with makes me laugh more than your average stand up comedian.

This week we start with a fruity mix up. When we were shopping for various items in the supermarket, we stopped in front of the squash because we needed to buy some. Andrew caught sight of the lemon squash, and asked if we could get the “white squash”. So I said “that’s lemon squash” and asked him if he was sure, and he was, even though he’s not had it before, and in it went to the basket. Later that day, Andrew asked me for a drink, so I asked him what he’d like to drink, to which his reply was “melon”. Slightly confused, I said that we didn’t have a melon in the fridge at the moment, but what would he like to drink. Back came an insistent “MELON”. So then I did the pointing game, and asked him to point to what he wanted. The penny dropped as he pointed at the LEMON squash! Melon, lemon – pretty similar really!

We’ve also had a couple of stating the obvious incidents which were worth a giggle. One evening he was insistent that he would like “ghetti” (spag-) for tea, and as the veg we had in the fridge seemed to suggest a pasta dish, I honoured his wish and cooked some spaghetti. When it was dished up in front of him, he looked at it with a pondering face and came out with: “it’s a bit long!” Erm, yes, that’s what spaghetti is Andrew! Another day we were putting his socks on before we went out; he lifted them up, looked at them, and said “they’re a bit socky!” Well yes, they’re socks, so I guess that does make them ‘socky’.

Now for a spot of singing. One evening, Tom was bathing the boys as usual and I was doing the washing up and clearing up the kitchen. Tom got Joel out first and was drying him and putting on his nappy on the change mat, when he became aware that Andrew was playing with a toy penguin and boat whilst singing. The tune was definitely ‘Rock a bye baby’, and the words started like this:

“Rock a bye penguin, in the boat,

When the water blows, the penguin will rock”

Tom says the next two lines were basically the same as the original rhyme, sung in Andrew pronunciation. He thought it was rather sweet, so called me in, but by the time I got there, the penguin lullaby was over and Andrew went all shy with an audience.

Apart from Andrew’s own cute and quirky speech, we’ve found ourselves saying some unusual and hilarious things to him – the kind of phrases that could only be said by a parent of a toddler. As Andrew was on his way to the bath one evening, he picked up a pair of bunny ears that were on the floor and put them on. Tom told him to take them off for the bath, because they’d only get wet and soggy. So Andrew picked up a toy tiara that was also on the floor (he has no aversion to wearing things that society would say are for girls only) and put it on. Again, Tom told him that it was no good for the bath, and found himself coming out with this: “Andrew, come on, no accessories are to be worn in the bath!” I couldn’t stop laughing at hearing that come out of his mouth 🙂

Potty training has gone well recently (we’ve been doing it in some shape or form for over a year, so it’s about time), and it’s finally clicked that he needs to do wees on the potty or toilet all the time, not just when he’s undistracted by something else. Just before dinner one day, he clearly knew that he needed to head to the potty, so he did, and just about made it before the flow started. The trouble was, it wasn’t quite pointing down well enough and it started to spray outwards, which he found funny. Unfortunately Joel wasn’t far away, and of course came nearer to explore the commotion, so Andrew decided it would be hilarious to keep the spray going rather than push it in (which he knows how to do because he does it most of the time) and shower Joel with wee. Nice! When Tom saw this and realised what was happening, he called across: “Andrew, you mustn’t wee on other people!” Now that’s something I never thought I’d hear my husband say! Cue a quick dunk in the bath for Joel before dinner that day.

Wot So Funee?

Toffee apple pie

This week the Great British bake off was all about pies. I don’t very often bake pies, usually just if I have a social occasion to bake a pudding for, or I buy the ready made pastry to do a quick savoury one. So this was a good opportunity to be inspired and bake a fruit pie as the contestants did in round 1.

I decided to go simple: a classic apple pie with a slight twist – cooking the apples in butter and brown sugar to give them a caramel/toffee flavour, with a dash of cinnamon. The pastry is a plain shortcrust, so overall the pie isn’t too sweet. I’ve made this quite a few times before, but not for a while. I know Tom loves a good fruit pie, and would have them more often if he could, so I knew this bake would go down well. Andrew also got very excited about having some – the boys usually have fruit and natural yoghurt for pudding, so it was a treat to have a small piece of apple pie on a Saturday night after tea. Not that they would have noticed, but the bake was good enough to avoid the infamous soggy bottom!

Apple pie

Here’s the recipe, which only has 8 ingredients, it really is that simple! Just make sure that you work with cold hands for the pastry, and don’t overwork it. If you like custard or cream, this would work well with one of those, but I’m not a fan of either on my puddings, and I like this just as it is.

Ingredients

Filling

  • 2 large bramley apples
  • 50g butter
  • 100g brown sugar
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp cornflour

Pastry

  • 370g plain flour
  • 200g butter
  • cold water

Method

  1. First make the pastry: I usually cut the butter into chunks and put it in the freezer for 10 minutes or so to chill it before using it (except this time I left it a bit longer and it was very cold, but it still worked fine).
  2. Rub the butter and flour together in a bowl with your fingers until you have a breadcrumb consistency.
  3. Make a well in the centre of the crumbs and add a little cold water at a time, bringing the dough together with your hands until it sticks together in a firm ball but isn’t overly sticky.
  4. Leave it to rest at (cool) room temperature until you have made the filling.
  5. Peel and chop the apples into chunks.
  6. Melt the butter, sugar and cinnamon in a pan and add the apple, stirring and cooking for a few minutes until golden.
  7. Sprinkle the cornflour over the apple filling and stir in, then leave aside to cool slightly.
  8. On a floured board, cut the pastry into 2 pieces, one about 2 thirds of the dough and one about a third.
  9. Roll out the bigger piece of pastry to fit the bottom of your pie dish, and press it down into the bottom and sides.
  10. Put the filling into the pie and spread around evenly.
  11. Roll out the remaining pastry until big enough to cover the top of the pie.
  12. Press down the edges of the pastry where the bottom bit touches the top bit, using a fork to make indents around the rim, and trim off any excess pastry around the rim.
  13. Use the fork to make some holes in the lid of the pie, so that steam can escape when baking.
  14. Bake in the oven at 180ºC for about 30-40 minutes until lightly golden.
  15. Eat as fresh as possible.

Cupcake of the month (July): red currant

I’ve not felt like baking in this baking heat, but yesterday saw a slight reprieve in the daytime temperature around here, a mere 24 degrees, so I seized the opportunity to sneak in July’s cupcake of the month recipe.

The cakes on the calendar this month were called ‘ruby-red’ cupcakes, and required red food colouring as well as cocoa powder to make a deep red colour. However, since we had red currants in the fruit and veg box this week, I thought that I’d make the cakes red by putting red currants in instead of the food colouring – as simple as that. The photos make them look more brown, but when you bite into them, there is lots of redness!IMG 1870

I also had some union jack cupcake cases left from last summer’s olympic and jubilee festivities, and I thought why not bake some cakes with lovely local British summer fruit in them.

IMG 1895

They turned out very well – the recipe makes quite a dense cake, very moist and tasty, as it has natural yoghurt in it. They weren’t too sweet either, as the red currants added a sharpness and the cocoa powder a bitterness as well as the sugar to sweeten. My testers approved, which is the main thing in our house.

Ingredients – makes 12

  • 130g self-raising flour
  • 100g sugar
  • 100ml yoghurt
  • 25g cocoa powder
  • 2 eggs
  • 100g margarine
  • 80g red currants
Drizzle
  • 50g margarine
  • 100g icing sugar
  • 20g red currants

Method

  1. Prepare a muffin tray with cupcake cases, and preheat the oven to 180ºC (fan).
  2. Cream the butter and sugar in a bowl until smooth and fluffy.
  3. Add the eggs and beat well.
  4. Add the flour and cocoa powder and mix until just combined.
  5. Add the red currants and yoghurt and mix until just combined.
  6. Spoon into the cases to about two thirds full.
  7. Bake for about 20 minutes until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean, and leave to cool.
  8. Meanwhile make up the drizzle by creaming the margarine, icing sugar and red currants together – I left a few lumpier bits of red currant for texture, but most of the juice went into the drizzle.
  9. Spoon it onto the top of the cakes.
  10. Eat and enjoy as fresh as possible.

Homemade ice lollies

This heat has reminded me that I haven’t blogged about our home made ice lollies yet! I bought a lolly mould from our local supermarket for £2 a while ago, and we’ve made a few batches of various flavours. They are the perfect size for little hands, and just the thing we need to cool off in this sunny weather. We’ve made them with pure fruit juices, so they aren’t full of added sugar, and even Joel has been able to enjoy gnawing on one, helping him not only with the heat but his teething gums too.

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This batch was a mix of raspberry and orange juices….

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And this batch was half grape juice and half apple juice (we froze the grape first and then added the apple once frozen to create the two-tier effect)….

IMG 1388

Such a simple idea, but very effective at cooling us off in the temperatures that we’re currently experiencing. Do you have any top tips for cool food and drinks with little ones in mind?

IMG 1394

The Clarabel buggy – wot so funee?

A couple of weeks ago I wrote about Andrew’s confusion between Thomas (the Tank Engine) and hummus. This week he had a couple more train name substitutions for other items. The first was another edible item. As we were eating dinner one evening, he looked down at his bowl and said “Look, it’s a Gordon”. I looked and said “Really? I can’t see Gordon”. He insisted and pointed at a green vegetable that was lurking in his meal. The penny dropped – “Ah you mean a courgette, Andrew!”, to which he replied “Yes Mummy, a courgette!” I guess it was fairly easy to mix up – the vowel is the same in both words at least!

The second train-related mix up happened when Daddy was explaining that we were going to go out the 4 of us with our 2 single buggies. We have a single Bugaboo that I use most of the time for Andrew and I wear Joel in the wrap, and we also have an old (but still going strong) Maclaren stroller that we keep in the boot of the car for when we go out in the car rather than having the rigmarole of getting the bigger buggy out of the flat and into the car etc. When we go out as a family we sometimes take both single buggies. As Daddy explained that Andrew was going in the Maclaren buggy and Joel in the Bugaboo, Andrew took it in carefully, and then repeated where he was going to sit – “in the Clarabel buggy!” Where’s the Annie buggy though?! Again, they seem fairly easy to mix up – one syllable, the ‘-clar-‘ is the same in both.

Andrew in the Clarabel buggy back in October, just before Joel was born
Andrew in the Clarabel buggy back in October, just before Joel was born

Apart from train-related words, we’ve also had a couple of other food pieces of vocab. In our fruit and veg box this week, we had those small orange-coloured fuzzy-skinned round fruits – also known as “babycots” in toddlerish. That’s not a bad attempt to copy my word “apricots” – he started of with something like “abey-cots” then went to “baby-cots”, probably because they are two words he knows and would associate them with each other – his baby brother sleeps in a cot in the same room as him.

And finally, something he’s said for a little while, but I haven’t heard him say recently and I’d forgotten he did it. For some reason that I can’t quite figure out, those crunchy potato bits that you get in bags (and flavoured with all sorts of random flavours that are nothing like the thing they are supposed to imitate the flavour of) are “crisp crisps”. It’s like he feels he needs to qualify that there may be some other type of crisp distinct from these crisp crisps. I can’t remember ever giving him soggy crisps, in fact I very rarely give him crisps at all – they are only consumed by him on special occasions such as parties, or he might be lucky enough to get one if he catches me trying to sneak a snack when he’s not looking. I know that toddlers quite often repeat a word or part of a word when they start talking – Andrew did this quite a bit when he was younger, but recently he’s not done it apart from this. It’s also pretty difficult to say – try it and see what I mean!

Wot So Funee?

Cupcake of the month (June): cheesecake cupcakes

This month my cupcake calendar came up with a more unusual type of cupcake, one which I’d never thought of doing before. The idea was to make little cheesecakes in cupcake cases – an actually very simple idea, but not something I’ve seen before. I didn’t follow the recipe in terms of ingredients much, I just used a basic baked cheesecake mixture that I’ve done before, but made it in cupcake cases instead of a large cake tin.

I wasn’t sure how they would turn out, but in the end they worked pretty well. A few had issues coming out of the tin – I think the key was to make sure no mixture spilled over the side when I poured it in or during the baking as the mixture rose slightly, because this left a sticky residue between paper and tin. The taste was delicious, just like any other baked cheesecake. These would be handy to serve at a buffet or party where there are lots of different choices and you’d like to try a little bit of a few things – no more trying to cut a small slither of a big cheesecake and it ending up disheveled!

Mini cheesecakes 2

Here’s the recipe…

Ingredients

  • 200g digestive biscuits
  • 125g margarine
  • 200g soft cheese (Philadelphia-style)
  • 100ml soured cream
  • 100g sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tsp vanilla essence
  • blueberries to decorate

Method

  1. Put cupcake cases into a 12-hole muffin tin and pre-heat the oven to 160ºC (fan).
  2. Put the digestives in a large bowl and crush them into crumbs using the end of a rolling pin.
  3. Melt the margarine in a smaller bowl in the microwave and add to the biscuit crumbs.
  4. Mix until well combined and stiff, then spoon into the cake cases and press down with your fingers to make the base.
  5. Mix the soft cheese, soured cream and sugar together, then beat in the eggs and vanilla essence.
  6. Pour the mixture into the paper cases on top of the biscuit base.
  7. Bake in the oven for about 25 minutes until just golden on top.
  8. Turn the oven off and leave the cakes to cool in there until they are cool enough to remove without oven gloves.
  9. Remove the cakes from the tin.
  10. Decorate each cake with a few blueberries or other fruit.
  11. Store in the fridge until eaten.

Easy blueberry pancakes

This must be one of the easiest recipes I’ve made. After the success of banana oatmeal pancakes, I wanted to make some more pancakes with a different fruit in. We also had quite a lot of natural yoghurt in the fridge, so I thought why not make pancakes with that – I’ve heard that buttermilk makes good pancakes, and yoghurt is very similar to this. So I mixed up a quick batter with half flour, half yoghurt and an egg. The fruit I chose was blueberries, because Joel hadn’t tried them yet and I knew they would cook down well and give a great flavour, texture and, most importantly, colour! They should be called purple-berries when cooked 🙂Bluberry pancakes Collage

These were a real hit with both boys. The recipe made about 10-12, so I froze some to bring out as snacks throughout the week.

Ingredients

  • 120g plain flour
  • 120g yoghurt
  • 1 egg
  • 100g fresh blueberries

Method

  1. Mix the flour, yoghurt and egg in a bowl until a thick batter forms.
  2. Stir in the blueberries (whole) until evenly distributed.
  3. Heat some olive oil in a large frying pan.
  4. Blob heaped teaspoons of batter into the pan and press down slightly.
  5. Let them cook for about 5 minutes on one side until they are nicely browned.
  6. Flip them over with a fish slice and let them cook for another 5 minutes or so until that side is nicely browned too.
  7. Remove them from the pan and place on kitchen towel.
  8. Eat as fresh as possible!

pancake eating Collage

Photo of the week – starting solids

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Team Lloyd

I’ve been meaning to join in with Photo of the Week over at Team Lloyd’s blog for a while now. Louise always takes such great photos and all those who join in with the linky showcase take amazing pictures too, so I wasn’t sure my snaps would fit, but Louise assured me that they would be welcome!

So here we are at the second week of Joel enjoying big boys’ food. After a few months of staring amazed at Andrew (and us, though we are less hilarious) eating, he’s finally taken the plunge himself and started devouring (and covering the floor with) the food that we put in front of him. This photo is one of several that I have showing funny moments with food. I was eating an orange cut into quarters and his arm gestures clearly showed that he wanted to have some, so I gave him a quarter. But he got frustrated that however he picked it up, it either slipped out of his hand or was the wrong way to get any flesh rather than a tongue full of peel! So I held it in my hand and he grabbed my fingers, pulled it towards him and started sucking at the flesh like this – clever chap really.

I’ve also been meaning to write about what he’s been eating, as I’ve kept a note of what we’ve given him, so this post is kind of killing two birds with one stone (except no birds were actually killed, it’s all been veggie cooking). Feel free to stop reading here if you’re just interested in the picture, I won’t be offended! I guess you could say we’re ‘doing baby-led weaning’, but I like to think of it as he’s just joining in with the kinds of things we like to eat as a family. So far it’s been quite simple things, but as he seems to give most things a go and enjoys them, we’re giving more and more things a go. He’ll probably be wolfing down his pasta and sauce just like Andrew in no time!

I also don’t like to call it ‘weaning’ as such, because that suggests the end of feeding on milk. As his older brother is still not ‘weaned’ in the sense that most people take it to mean, though most of his daily calorific intake comes from solid food and the milk is just a comfort thing before bed, I’m happy for Joel to carry on breastfeeding as long as he wants to as well, which may be soon or not for a while, who knows (except him). For this reason I tend to call the process he is currently undertaking ‘starting solids’.

So to finish this post that started with a photo of Joel eating an orange, I’ll leave you with a list of what he’s been enjoying so far, and that ends with an orange 🙂

Week 1 (28th April – 4th May)

  • Sweet potato
  • Suede
  • Butternut squash
  • Parsnip
  • Carrot
  • Broccoli
  • Melon
  • Banana
  • Porridge – oats and warm milk

Week 2 (5th – 11th May)

  • All of the above plus….
  • White bread – homemade in bread maker with no salt
  • Natural yoghurt
  • Mature cheddar chunks
  • Plain pasta shapes
  • Mashed potato
  • Orange

Lemon drizzle cake

For Christmas, Tom bought me a weekly fruit and veg box, which was a fantastic present. I’d been saying for a while that I wanted to buy fruit and veg that’s grown as locally as possible, but I find I don’t have the time to get to a green grocers as well as the supermarket for our other groceries, and when I’m in the supermarket I don’t seem to have the patience to look at all the labelling and spot which fruit and veg are grown in the UK or, better still, in East Anglia. And I’m not an expert on what’s in season when. So Tom acted on my whinges and chose a local company – Cambridge Organic Food Company – to deliver to us. If you live in the area I’d highly recommend them. We get the smallest mixed box and it’s easily enough veg for us for a week, and we eat a lot of it, though I buy one more item of fruit such as a bunch of grapes, a bunch of bananas or a melon. This works out quite a bit cheaper than national companies like Abel & Cole and Riverford. Overall I reckon that we spend no more on this than we would if I got good quality organic stuff from a supermarket, and it tastes so good. Plus we know that each item comes from as local a source as possible, and it’s less for me to carry back in the buggy from the shop – often fruit and veg can mean almost a whole supermarket trip in themselves. We get to tailor our box to our needs and tastes, such as by stating what we would rather not have, which brings me onto…… lemon drizzle cake (finally).

Last week we got a lemon in the box for the first time. As we rarely use lemons, I subsequently added it to our “no thank you” list (which so far only consists of lemons!), but as we had this one, I thought about what I could make – this is another good thing about getting a box, as it’s a surprise each week, which makes you try items and recipes that you wouldn’t necessarily think of otherwise. I immediately thought sweet rather than savoury, so lemon drizzle cake sprang to mind. This isn’t a cake I’d normally go for myself, but I know Tom loves it, so I did it more for him. Of course I tried it too 😉

The recipe I came up with after doing a bit of googling is inspired by a few different recipes, and is simple to make. The ground almonds make it really moist, and the lemon flavour is intense as it comes from three sources: zest in the sponge, juice in the syrup poured over the cake when warm to soak in, and juice in the crunchy icing drizzled over the top. Note that not all the juice came fresh from the one lemon – I used some Jif too! Tom loves lemon cake, but he likes it best when it actually tastes of lemon rather than the lemon-ish ones that you can buy in the shops. He says he often wishes they were made with twice as much lemon, just like his Nan used to make. So that was my aim, and after tasting it, he gave me the thumbs up for lemon-ness – hooray!

Are you feeling like a lemon today?! Why not have a go too……

Ingredients

Cake

  • 180g margarine
  • 180g sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 120g self-raising flour
  • 60g ground almonds
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • zest of 1 lemon
Syrup
  • 60g icing sugar
  • 60ml lemon juice
Icing
  • 60g granulated sugar
  • 30g icing sugar
  • juice of half a lemon – about 20ml

Method

  1. Grease a 1lb loaf tin (I used a silicone tin so no greasing needed) and pre-heat the oven to 180ºC (fan).
  2. Cream the margarine and sugar together in a bowl until light and fluffy.
  3. Beat in the egg until smooth.
  4. Add the lemon zest and stir in.
  5. Add the flour, baking powder and ground almonds and mix until just combined – don’t over mix.
  6. Pour into the tin and bake for around 30 minutes until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean.
  7. Meanwhile, to make the syrup, heat the icing sugar and lemon juice in a pan until it comes to the boil and allow to simmer until the sugar is fully dissolved and it starts to go darker in colour.
  8. Remove the cake from the oven, and while still warm, make several holes across the top using a skewer. Pour the syrup over the top while it’s still in the tin.
  9. Allow to cool before removing from the tin and transferring to a plate.
  10. Mix the icing ingredients in a bowl until smooth. Pour this over the centre of the top of the cake and allow it to drizzle down the sides.
  11. Eat as fresh as possible – Tom tasted it after about 10 minutes of it being complete!
Link up your recipe of the week