Doughnuts at nursery – wot so funee?

I realised recently that i haven’t written a wot so funee? post for a few weeks. Life got busy with the move and the business getting busier by the week. Althoughh blogging may be on the back burner, I still want to keep a record of our lives on it, and that includes the funny things that the boys say, because language is something that really interests me and I want to look back on their language development one day and smile 🙂 So here are just few of the funees that I’ve collected over recent weeks….

When I was cutting Andrew’s finger nails one day, he insisted that I hadn’t finished when I thought I had. We counted the 10 fingers and I showed him that I’d cut the nail on all of them. “No, Mummy…. and my foot nails!” How wrong I was! It’s logical to call them foot nails, but it made me giggle.

One day (OK, it’s most days) Joel was annoying Andrew when they were playing in their bedroom/play room. “Go outside at mediately!” said Andrew. No that’s not autocorrect on my post, that’s ‘at mediately’ for ‘immediately’. He said this several times, with a crescendo at each repetition of the command. Joel didn’t take any notice of him, so in the end Andrew shrugged his shoulders and quietly said “OK, I’ll go outside then” as he walked off into the garden. If you can’t get rid of little brother, remove yourself from the room instead – it makes sense.

Andrew has recently started nursery (preschool). He goes 2 afternoons and 1 morning; in the afternoons he gets a snack at about 3.30pm. Whenever I ask him what he had, his answer has been things like cheese and crackers, fruit, salad, humous and dips with flat bread etc. The following was an interesting conversation I had with him yesterday after preschool…

Me: So, Andrew, did you have a nice snack at preschool today?

Andrew: YES! We had doughnuts!

M: Doughnuts?! [I mean I don’t mind him having the odd treat, but it seemed odd when other days there were much healthier options]

A: Yes they were round with a hole in.

M: Ah, so ring doughnuts? So they didn’t have anything in them, like jam.

A: No we had a spread on top of them.

M: Right…. what flavour was the spread? 

A: It was cheesy, very yummy.

M: Aha…. were they not bagels Andrew, with cream cheese on?

A: Ah yes, they were bagels, but they looked like doughnuts cut up.

M: Great!

So it turns out I won’t be needing to mention the nutritional content of snacks to his key worker after all. Phew!

I hope to write up more funees that I have saved in the notes on my phone soon!

Wot So Funee?

Birds don’t have rain coats – wot so funee?

This week seems to have been a bumper week for funees, or maybe I just remembered to write more of them down?! Let’s start with a few animal ones. When we were at the garden centre (which has a very reasonably priced and nice soft play), we did our usual tour of the pets corner and saw some fish, amongst other creatures. We usually see quite a few ‘Nemo’ fish there as Andrew calls them (not that he’s ever seen the film, but he knows who Nemo is), but this week Andrew spotted another noteworthy one: “Look Mummy, it’s a bit like Tiggler!” I had to stop and think – my first thought was Tigger (did it look like a tiger?! – not really), then I got it – Ah, Tiddler! Yes he looks a bit like Tiddler, though it’s been a while since we read that book.

Following on from the lion guinea pig of last week’s funee post, we were walking through the park one day and saw some dogs, as usual. Andrew spotted a little one that had short white fur with a couple of big black patches on it: “That’s a bit like a cow puppy!” I could see where he was coming from, it did look like a mini cow with that fur.

As I’m sure many people have experienced this week, we’ve been nipping in and out of the garden depending on the showers outside. On one occasion when we were outside and it started to rain, I said to Andrew that we should go inside because it was starting to rain and we had no coats on. His reply, with a look of ‘but why mummy?!’, was thus: “But the birds are staying out mummy, and they don’t have coats on!” True, very true. I didn’t quite know how to come back from that one.

The rain was well and truly set in on Saturday when Daddy took the boys into town to another soft play centre that he found by googling which I hadn’t thought of before, even though I’ve driven past it many times when I used to live here myself. At dinner time later that day, Daddy was telling me all about his fun with transporting the boys from the car to the centre in the pouring rain – including how he forgot to put Joel’s coat on at first so had to get him back down off his back in the sling and put him back up, which he’s less practised at than me. Anyway…. in the middle of this conversation between the 2 of us, bearing in mind that it was heavily based around the theme of rain, Andrew piped up with: ”I had a leak!” It took us a moment to figure out that he actually meant “I had a leek!” (which is a rare event for him, and indeed there was a slightly smaller pile on his plate than when we started our conversation). It was an unfortunate, yet funny, homonym for that situation.

Here are the token foodie funees for this week. Wotsits create a lot of mess, as I’m sure any parent who has given them to a young child will attest. Andrew had finished eating a packet and of course had orange cheesiness all around his mouth and on his hands. When we pointed this out to him, his reply was a very matter of fact: “That’s the problem with the crisps.” He was right, and that was that. Sometimes Andrew asks for a snack if he’s hungry and there isn’t any sign of a meal coming up (he sometimes asks when there is a meal in sight too). One day, when I was sorting out a few things from my bag when we’d got back from a group at lunch time, Andrew was getting a little impatient for lunch and came out with: “I’d like something to get me going!” It took me a moment to realise that he meant ‘keep him going’.

On Sunday we had some friends come for dinner – the boys’ Godmum along with a family who we haven’t seen for a long time and the daughter is exactly a year older than Andrew so they got on very well playing together. After we’d had dinner, I suggested to Andrew that he and his friend go into the other room and play with his ‘big boys’ toys’ and let the little ones play with the general toys in the living room where we were. His friend’s mum asked her too if she wanted to go and play with the toys in the other room. Andrew stopped, looked at his friend’s mum and said “what do you say?” , as if to imply “should there be a ‘please’ in there?” Of course we all laughed at his cheekiness, and I said to him that that was a bit cheeky! He turned around and insisted “No! It’s not cheating, Mummy!” By this point we were all in fits of laughter, and off they went into the other room to play with play dough, Thunderbird toys and other games.

Wot So Funee?

The ducks don’t work – wot so funee?

We’ve had a bit of a break from wot so funee? posts over Easter and then last week when all I blogged about nappies for Resuable Nappy Week. As I’m getting back to normal on the blog this week, it seems only right to write up the best of the funees from the past few weeks.

I’ve written before about thhe fact that Andrew says yesterday for anything in the past and tomorrow for anything in the future. Fair enough, he’s a bit young still to be understanding the concept of weeks, months etc. But recently he’s had a thing about saying “this year”, which I think is related to when we explain to him that this year he is 3, but next year he will be 4. So we’ve had: “It’s quite a sunny day this year” and “I want Granny and Grandad to come home this year” – I presume he’s just thinking logically that it must mean ’now’, from when we say it, though he does know ’today’ and mainly uses that but ’this year’ creeps in too.

We quite often go to the local park on bin day, which, apart from being a pain to get the buggy through the gap between wheelie bins and garden fences on the pavement, means we get a running commentary on what the bins are like from our little chatterbox. He has quite rightly noticed that some are smaller than others on one particular road that we walk along – “Those are children bins and those are grown-up bins!” Yes that’s right Andrew, a whole family of bins line up on this street every Monday morning!

When we were on holiday with his four grandparents, Andrew was keen to do lots of activities with them. This included wanting to take some pictures with Grandad’s camera. As Grandad knelt down to take a photo of a pretty flower in the park, Andrew asked “Can I have a do?” No that isn’t a typo – he asked for a do rather than a go. Which to be fair to him, makes total sense, because taking photos is something that we ‘do’ rather than ‘go’ anywhere with. He hasn’t quite grasped the phrase ‘to have a go’, where ‘go’ is a noun not a verb like he’s used to.

Having studied several other languages, I’ve often thought that I’m glad I learned English natively as a child – it’s just so full of irregularities and peculiarities! We take it for granted as adult speakers of a language that we know these, but they can be really confusing to a learner, whether child or adult. One of these irregularities Andrew demonstrated perfectly when we were feeding the ducks and other birdlife down at the shores of Derwent Water on holiday…

Adult (I can’t remember who exactly): Look there are geese and ducks here Andrew.

Andrew: Aha!

A few minutes later….

Me: Watch that goose! Don’t go too close to him, he looks nasty!

Andrew: It’s not a goose, it’s a geese!

Me: I know, that’s so confusing!

And I proceeded to try and explain that it was one goose and two/three/more geese. Stupid English!

Then there was the time on another day of our holiday that he toddled off with Grandad to go and feed the ducks some duck food that we’d bought earlier in the week. We were between Rydal Water and Grasmere next to a small river that had a few ducks hanging around on it. But when they came back, Andrew was most disappointed because the ducks there didn’t want any of his special food: “the ducks don’t work here!” I mean come on, what were they playing at? Surely any self-respecting duck would want to eat some food wielded by an enthusiastic 3 year old, wouldn’t they?

As I’ve written before, no wot so funee? post would be complete without a foodie funee or two. Both boys would probably say that pasta is their favourite food. Joel can’t talk yet, though he’s very into signing at the moment, but the non-verbal cues that he gives me are very clear, i.e. shove it in fistfuls at a time until his cheeks are stuffed like a hamster and he can’t chew it down fast enough! I whipped up a quick pasta and cheese dish one lunchtime, like I often do (to call it a ‘dish’ is a little OTT, it’s just pasta mixed with grated cheese until it melts). Andrew was very impressed with what I served up in front of him, and when he tried to pick some up with his fork, a big clump of pasta came up with the fork: “Look, the pasta is cheesing together!” I thought that was quite an ingenious way of describing it actually.

Andrew has been a bit fussy with fruit and veg recently, though he did eat 4 pears today – he has a bit of a thing about this fruit, he gets his 5 a day, it’s just almost all pear! But I’m trying to be persistent with raisins on his breakfast cereal, which he used to always have until he got fussy with it a few weeks ago. So I asked the usual one morning…

Me: Would you like some raisins Andrew?

Andrew: No, I don’t like the dead ones!

Right…. wot so funee about that?

Wot So Funee?

Don’t get Thunderbirds wrong! – wot so funee?

As I sit and start to type this post, it’s pouring with rain outside. To be fair, it hasn’t been too rainy recently, but it’s making up for it today. This seems a good point to start with a funee moment from when the boys were at the park with Daddy at the weekend. Andrew was standing on the ground and Joel was just above him on the climbing frame, looking down. Andrew looked up to the sky and said: “Is it raining Daddy?” And Daddy’s (honest) reply was: “No Andrew, it’s just Joel dribbling on your head!” This is quite normal for Joel – copious amounts of dribble are often seen escaping from his mouth, hence the need for mummy-made super absorbent dribble bibs.

As usual, we’ve been spending quite a bit of time in the garden this past week, especially when I was ill and it was the easiest thing to entertain the boys with, simply by opening the door and letting them run off steam without too much effort from me. Andrew is very into the game pictured here, though this was taken after Joel had knocked it down and put golf balls in some of the holes – little brothers can be SO annoying! Andrew has heard us say the name of the game quite a bit, but the other day he asked if we could play it before I mentioned any names…

Andrew: “Can we play forget 4 please?”

Me: “Forget 4??”

Andrew: “No wait…. cadet 4?”

Me: “Ah I think you mean CONNECT 4 Andrew!” 🙂

IMG 1785

The trees are starting to be colourful again, so we’ve been talking about spring and what this means in terms of tree life cycles. Granny and Grandad’s garden has a lovely (except when it sheds all its petals in one go) magnolia tree, which is currently making the lawn look like it’s been hit by a freak snow storm. To try and cheer me up when I was ill, Andrew came up to me and kindly offered me a petal: “Look, here’s a blossom for you Mummy! There’s lots of blossoms here.” Aw, cute that he thinks one petal is one blossom rather than blossom being the collective noun.

No wot so funee? post from me would be complete without a foodie funee (or several). Andrew often asks what’s for tea these days, and I get met with various reactions depending on my answer. Here’s what happened one day this week…

Andrew: “What we having for tea?”

Me: “Casserole Andrew.”

Andrew: “Oh…… Hmm…. I do like roll!” *moves hand around in a gesture the shape of a swiss roll* (I wish I’d got a video of the hand bit – that really made the funee at the time!)

There’s been a new cereal in the cupboard this week – ‘Copters’ by Kelloggs Coco Pops. Andrew of course thinks these are amazing because (a) they look like helicopter blades and (b) they turn the milk chocolatey which he can drink with a straw after he’s eaten the cereals. He sometimes has a bit of trouble remembering the shortened name though (he can say helicopter fine), so a few mornings he has asked for “hocters”.

I’ve mentioned several times before that Andrew (along with his brother) is very active. When he was tearing around the living room crazily the other day, Granny asked him: “Where so you get all your energy from? Can I have some?” His response was: “From a doctor!” Aha, now we know the secret – quick, let’s all go to this doctor for a boost! Of course it might also help that Andrew has access to secret Thunderbird powers. Like when he attaches two small mole cuddly toys to himself, holding them underneath his arms, and these become his super powerful engines that blast him like a rocket around the house. Yes, we’re still mad about Thunderbirds and rockets, no change there.

In fact he now thinks of himself as so clued up on Thunderbirds that he has the right to tell us off when we don’t get it right. One of Grandad’s favourite little sayings at the moment is ‘don’t get X wrong’, which apparently comes from Alan Partridge (who I believe said ‘don’t get Bond wrong’). Grandad uses it in the context of anything that is said wrongly – so he replaces X with whatever it might be. Of course Andrew, being the little sponge that he is, had soaked this one up without us knowing, that is until one evening this week when it became quite clear… The boys have a ‘routine’ for going up to bath, which (surprise, surprise) also includes Thunderbirds! Andrew pretends to be one of the Thunderbird rockets/vehicles and he assigns one to Joel too, then they each blast off upstairs in the manner of the chosen rocket. Except one evening Daddy got it mixed up, and called Joel Thunderbird 1 when he’d been assigned Thunderbird 3. Cue Andrew… “No! Don’t get Thunderbirds wrong!!” And it was said with intonation just like Grandad/Alan. We all creased up with laughter 🙂

And finally for this week, we have a lovely piece of art work from the budding young artist Andrew. After dinner one day he got down from the table whilst Joel was just finishing off his food. We could see that he was drawing something on his easel with chalk. When he stepped away we could see the finished design – ta da! Then I asked what it was. His reply (in a very ‘well don’t you know?’ kind of tone: “a banana!” Of course, I can see it now, a banana, silly me! (?!?)


Wot So Funee?

Milking it with milkshake – wot so funee?

It’s started: Andrew now knows exactly how to cause us embarrassment when out and about by people watching and saying what he sees. He has the observational and vocabulary skills to speak his mind, but lacks the social skills to know what is acceptable. So on our day trip to Birmingham this week, we had a few close encounters with the general public. First of all on the train, there was the person asleep by the window as Andrew went and sat on Granny’s lap on the neighbouring aisle seat: “That one’s asleep!”. Not anymore if you shout that at them. Then there was the girl eating her lunch across the aisle: “That girl’s got a sandwich!” Luckily this passenger thought his observation was rather cute and laughed it off. And then there was the man with the Mohican hair in the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery tea room: “That’s funny hair!” Well that’s what we were all thinking but only a toddler would air his views with such volume and openness.

One of the best bits about going to Birmingham (from Coventry) on the train, if you’re a plane-mad 3 year old that is, is the view of the airport runway and terminals on the way. On the way there, he spotted that big tower that controls the air traffic and exclaimed excitedly: “Look, it’s the remote control tower!” I find this interesting linguistically – he’s obviously heard us say remote control as well as just control for the thing you zap channels with on the TV, and I presume he’s also applied this to the tower that he’s heard us call the control tower. On the way back from our day trip, I spotted the airport first (go me!)…

Me: Look Andrew, there’s a plane over there, at the airport.

Andrew: Ooooh, it might be Fireflash! 

Yet another Thunderbirds reference, this is our world at the moment.

In last week’s wot so funee? post, I shared lots of foodie funees. This week there were fewer, and here’s the first and probably funniest… To set the scene, we were having a bit of rough and tumble play, which usually involves me getting down on the floor and getting sat/trampled on by the boys. At one point I stuck my leg out and Andrew sat on it like he does with Daddy or male grandparents sometimes, expecting me to lift him up and down as if he were riding a horse. I can’t actually manage that these days with his weight, but he accepted a compromise – me chanting the rhyme ‘ride a cock horse’ instead. So I recited the rhyme all the way up to the last line, and thought I’d pause to see if Andrew could say the key word. Here’s how it turned out…

Me: …with rings on her fingers and bells on her toes, she shall have……

Andrew: PASTA!

Me: [giggling] erm, I don’t think she will have pasta, can you remember the word that comes here in the rhyme?… she shall have……

Andrew: PIZZA!

Me: [laughing] I don’t think it’s any kind of food actually

Andrew: err raisins?

Me: Still food

Andrew: errr….curry?

Me: nevermind. It’s MUSIC, she shall have MUSIC wherever she goes!

Andrew: Aaaahhh

We’ve all had various symptoms of a cold this past week or so, including a sore, froggy throat for Andrew. He’s generally not one to let a bit of illness get him down, but one afternoon after his nap he was very groggy. So Granny suggested that he might like a special chocolate milkshake to help his poorly throat, which of course he downed in no time. But then he caught on, and even when he was clearly feeling better, he tried to milk it (pun intended) and get more chocolatey drinks by pulling a sad face and insisting that he was poorly. This came to a head one evening just after bath, which is always supervised by Daddy.

Andrew: Can I have a milkshake please Daddy? I’m poorly [sad face :(]

Daddy: I’m not sure that you’re really that poorly anymore Andrew. Shall we ask Mummy to see if she thinks it’s a good idea.

Andrew: OK!….[walks to top of stairs and shouts down to the kitchen]….Mummy! Can I have a milkshake please?….[walks back to bathroom]….Mummy says I can have a milkshake!

Daddy: Really?!

Andrew: Yes!

What Andrew failed to realise is that Daddy knew I was in our bedroom feeding Joel. Got to give him points for being clever enough to try and play us off against each other like that. But it didn’t win him any milkshakes this time.

For a just turned 3 year old, Andrew is quite adept at letters of the alphabet, and enjoys reading letters on anything and breaking down words into sounds. He’ll quite often come out with the phrase ‘A for Apple’ or whatever it is that he’s referring to – “B for Ball”, “J for Jumper”, “M for Mummy”….even “CH for cheese” (recognising that ‘ch’ is a sound that’s made up of 2 letters) and the classic “T for ‘tato”. Had to laugh at that one, but I know it’s normal – he’s picking up the stressed syllable as that’s what most English words start with, just a shame that potato doesn’t.

In a previous wot so funee post I described how Andrew likes to make up adjectives to stick on the end of the phrase ‘it’s a bit…’. This week’s offerings on this front include the following. When referring to Daddy’s new coat that we bought him one day as a belated birthday present (he said he wanted to think about exactly what type he wanted for his new job and commute), Andrew said: “It’s a bit coaty….and it’s a bit cosy!” That’s very true. When referring to a mini table football ball with the classic hexagon pattern, Andrew said: “It’s got blacky bits and whitey bits.” Or you could just say it’s got black bits and white bits, could you not?

To end with, I have something that’s rather cute as well as funny. One of his latest phrases, as I wrote last week, is “I like you, Mummy/Daddy/Grandad/Granny etc.” This week he came out with a beautiful one: “I like you Joel, you’re my best friend!” Awwww 🙂

Wot So Funee?

Mill Road Winter Fair – #CountryKids

We’ve lived in Cambridge for over 7 years, and 3 years of that was near Mill Road – a lively road with lots of shops, cafes and bars that give a real multicultural and independent atmosphere to the area, so much so that there was much opposition when a Tesco express and Costa Coffee opened up on the road. However, I have never made it to the Mill Road Winter Fair that runs on the first Saturday in December every year. Tom went last year and the year before with Andrew, but I’d decided to have my usual peaceful and restful Saturday morning about the flat. But as this year was my (and Joel’s) last chance before we leave Cambridge to experience the atmosphere of the fair, which Tom highly recommended, I thought I’d give it a go and we all went as a family.

Mill rd Collage 1

As with most events these days, we were up and about much earlier than it started – we arrived at one end of the road at about 10am, but things weren’t due to start up properly until 10.30am. So we stopped at the park for a while, and had a run around with the ball, and Andrew went on the playground. We could see that some stalls were ready, so we went over slowly and walked through some tents which had all sorts of local crafts on display, and some great Christmas present ideas. We decided to buy some homemade biscuits, and as we walked over to a space to stop and have our snacks, Daddy told us that this particular bit of road was where the fire engine was meant to be stationed.

Mill rd Collage 2

There was no sign of it yet, but just as Daddy walked around to see if it was further down the road, it pulled up! Andrew was most impressed, and we stood there watching the fire-fighters get their stall outside the engine ready as we had our snack. They told us we had to wait until the road was closed to traffic at 10.30am before they would let people see inside the fire engine, so we wandered on and came back 10 minutes later to look inside. Andrew got to climb up into the cab and put on a fire helmet, whilst the fireman explained what the breathing apparatus was behind the seats that he was sat on.

Mill rd Collage 3

We then wandered down the road a bit more, and passed various stalls outside the shops on our way. There was food from all over the world, live music from various types of musician/band, and other entertainments and activities, including a jester that Andrew was fascinated by. The boys love listening to music, particularly when it’s live, so we had to stop and listen/dance several times. Apart from the inevitable music stops, we were also shown how to make a simple angel decoration for the Christmas tree at one stall. Another attraction that grabbed Andrew’s attention was the free red helium balloons that they were giving away at one of the churches on the road. The first one he was given flew away within about 10 seconds (see the sky photo below – I don’t think he quite understood that it wouldn’t come back if he let go!), so he was kindly offered another and kept hold of that until we tied it onto him.

Mill rd Collage 4

Half way down this long road is a railway bridge, so of course we had to stop and look at the trains going in and out of the station for a few minutes, until we persuaded him that there was more interesting stuff to see and do further on. More helium balloons could be spotted in the distance, purple ones not red this time, but first we had to navigate through a crowd of people watching the Morris dancers in the middle of the road! That was fun to watch for a while, as was a drumming band and a flute quartet.

Mill rd Collage 5

As we neared the end of the road, which Andrew had keenly walked all the way down, and Joel was on my back most of the time, they were both clearly getting tired from all the activity. There was just one last thing to stop and look at: a bike hooked up to a generator which powered an amplifier system so that when someone pedalled the bike you could hear a band play! Daddy thought this was very clever, though Andrew was more concerned to say hello to a giant penguin who was walking round giving out treats from his stocking.

Mill rd Collage 6

We didn’t get chance to stop and look at everything or do all the free activities for kids on the way, there was just so much going on. The atmosphere was amazing, so good to see such a lively and friendly community spirit, with people from all different walks of life sharing their talents, cuisine and Christmas messages. I’m glad Joel and I got to go to this fair before we leave Cambridge, I will definitely remember the fun we had, even if he doesn’t!

Linking up with #CountryKids again, because outdoor fun can happen anywhere, in the middle of a city as well as in the countryside 🙂


Country Kids from Coombe Mill Family Farm Holidays Cornwall

Apple day at Burwash Manor – #CountryKids

A few weeks ago we saw an advert for an Apple Day at Burwash Manor near Cambridge that was happening last weekend. We’ve not been to an apple day before, but Tom googled it and found that it’s quite a common tradition for places to put one on. The posters said that there would be various things on there throughout the day, including mini steam train rides and tractor rides, as well as apple related things like stalls selling apples, cider and watching apples be juiced. We knew that the non-apple stuff that was mentioned would be appealing to Andrew, and the entrance fee seemed reasonable for a family, so we headed off to be there for when it opened.

We parked in a muddy field – when I realised that this really wasn’t the weekend to be without our toddler sling that was away to be repaired, and we had to get the buggy out. It wasn’t so muddy when we got to the main field though, and then there was a path too around the toy/craft/food shops bit. The first thing that Andrew saw was the tractors, which were having a ‘ploughing contest’ first thing in the morning. He and Daddy nipped up the field to have a closer look, whilst I waited at the car for Joel to wake up from his nap.

Apple day 1

As we walked up the field towards the entrance, Andrew spotted the next amazing treat in store: the mini steam train that was chugging up the field on its own little track. So he ran off in front of us and, although we called him back, the ladies on the gate had to stop him from running right in without us! We explained that we needed to pay them, and he was happy when he got a sticker to show that we’d paid. Of course he had to have a go on the train before we did anything else. This was in fact the same train that he had been on at another country fair a few months ago – it’s a local enthusiast who has his own portable mini steam railway who goes to event like this and charges a not unreasonable amount for rides.

Apple day 2

There were a few other fairground type rides, but at double the cost of a train ride, we persuaded him that after we’d looked around some other things he could have another train ride. So we headed off to the other parts of the event. The next thing that Andrew spotted was a playground with swings, slides and climbing frames. Of course we then spent a good amount of time there, although it had been raining so the boys got quite wet – they didn’t seem to mind though, and I always carry spare clothes for these kind of situations.

After we’d exhausted the playground, we headed off towards the courtyard where there are little craft, toy and food shops, and on the day there were also food and drink stalls selling fancy cups of coffee and up-market burgers and sausages etc. We had a browse of a few shops, and spent quite a bit of time in the toy shop because they rather handily had some toys on display that you can play with, including a train set!

Apple day 3

When we came out of that shop, we saw that a steel band was about to start playing in the courtyard. They played some classic songs and the music sounded very happy. Quite  a crowd gathered, and there were several young children standing at the front, and most of them joined in with some dancing that a few of them started off. Andrew danced a bit, though he seemed too concentrated on being fascinated with the music to want to dance that much.

Apple day 4

We then headed back towards the field near the entrance, where they were now in full swing juicing apples at one of the stands. This was fun to watch, and Andrew was again fascinated by the machine that took apples in at one end and out came juice at the other. We watched that for quite a while! Opposite this stand were some stalls selling apples and local honey. We tried a few different varieties of apple and then decided to buy some to take home with us. When asked which apple he liked best to take home, Andrew replied with “pear”! So he got a few pears to take home – to be fair, he loves pears, and although he eats apples, pears are a definite favourite at the moment.

Apple day 5

As he had been a good boy, we allowed Andrew his second train ride as promised, and after this we headed out back to the car, passing the tractors on our way, which were still ploughing for the competition. We’d hoped that we could have a tractor ride, but it seemed that these must have been scheduled for later in the afternoon, and we felt as though we’d done what there was for young children and they were getting tired.

It was a fun morning out and we’re glad that we got to experience an apple day for the first time.

Linking up with the fab #CountryKids linky over at Coombe Mill’s blog 🙂

Country Kids from Coombe Mill Family Farm Holidays Cornwall

A mouthful – Photo of the week

PotW 21st Jun 2013

I posted a picture of Joel eating a few weeks ago for Photo of the week, and here I am with another classic one of him with a mouthful of food! You can tell it’s full because it’s closed – he always smiles with a big wide grin otherwise. He has taken to solid food very well, and is now just eating the meals that we eat very happily. He’s still working on some teeth, but he’s managing perfectly well without any, just gumming things until they go soft enough to break up and swallow. Yummy!

Team Lloyd

The Clarabel buggy – wot so funee?

A couple of weeks ago I wrote about Andrew’s confusion between Thomas (the Tank Engine) and hummus. This week he had a couple more train name substitutions for other items. The first was another edible item. As we were eating dinner one evening, he looked down at his bowl and said “Look, it’s a Gordon”. I looked and said “Really? I can’t see Gordon”. He insisted and pointed at a green vegetable that was lurking in his meal. The penny dropped – “Ah you mean a courgette, Andrew!”, to which he replied “Yes Mummy, a courgette!” I guess it was fairly easy to mix up – the vowel is the same in both words at least!

The second train-related mix up happened when Daddy was explaining that we were going to go out the 4 of us with our 2 single buggies. We have a single Bugaboo that I use most of the time for Andrew and I wear Joel in the wrap, and we also have an old (but still going strong) Maclaren stroller that we keep in the boot of the car for when we go out in the car rather than having the rigmarole of getting the bigger buggy out of the flat and into the car etc. When we go out as a family we sometimes take both single buggies. As Daddy explained that Andrew was going in the Maclaren buggy and Joel in the Bugaboo, Andrew took it in carefully, and then repeated where he was going to sit – “in the Clarabel buggy!” Where’s the Annie buggy though?! Again, they seem fairly easy to mix up – one syllable, the ‘-clar-‘ is the same in both.

Andrew in the Clarabel buggy back in October, just before Joel was born
Andrew in the Clarabel buggy back in October, just before Joel was born

Apart from train-related words, we’ve also had a couple of other food pieces of vocab. In our fruit and veg box this week, we had those small orange-coloured fuzzy-skinned round fruits – also known as “babycots” in toddlerish. That’s not a bad attempt to copy my word “apricots” – he started of with something like “abey-cots” then went to “baby-cots”, probably because they are two words he knows and would associate them with each other – his baby brother sleeps in a cot in the same room as him.

And finally, something he’s said for a little while, but I haven’t heard him say recently and I’d forgotten he did it. For some reason that I can’t quite figure out, those crunchy potato bits that you get in bags (and flavoured with all sorts of random flavours that are nothing like the thing they are supposed to imitate the flavour of) are “crisp crisps”. It’s like he feels he needs to qualify that there may be some other type of crisp distinct from these crisp crisps. I can’t remember ever giving him soggy crisps, in fact I very rarely give him crisps at all – they are only consumed by him on special occasions such as parties, or he might be lucky enough to get one if he catches me trying to sneak a snack when he’s not looking. I know that toddlers quite often repeat a word or part of a word when they start talking – Andrew did this quite a bit when he was younger, but recently he’s not done it apart from this. It’s also pretty difficult to say – try it and see what I mean!

Wot So Funee?

Fun in the ‘garden’ with our Little Pals gardening set – #CountryKids

Before I knew I was pregnant with Andrew, we were looking to buy a flat in Cambridge. The week after we paid a reserve deposit on a newly built flat in a great location within walking distance from the city centre (about 30 minutes), a pregnancy test showed up positive. I’m not sure knowing this earlier would have affected our decision – with property prices being so high around here we wouldn’t have afforded anywhere bigger within the city – but one thing I was slightly concerned about was that we had no garden of our own for a small child to have fun in. But there is a communal garden, which we do use quite a lot to play in, and there are a few local parks only a short walk away, and we have a balcony, which isn’t a bad size. It’s on this balcony that we’ve had fun with gardening recently – and I like to think that our situation is proof that you don’t need a big garden to have gardening fun with a toddler!

Andrew and Granny planting seeds
Andrew and Granny planting seeds

Over the nearly 3 years that we’ve been here, we’ve managed to grow more and more food on our balcony. It first started off with a couple of tomato plants; this year we have four tomato plants in big (faded) red planter bags, several runner bean plants (some in a planter bag and some in a tub hanging over the balcony rail), strawberries, various herbs, radishes, onions, carrots and lettuces (all in tubs hanging over the balcony rail). We also have some sunflowers, but they’ve had to come in as a slug ate one of them. I have to say that it’s really Granny who’s taken the lead on this, bringing seeds and plants as she’s sorted out some for her own garden. I’m not naturally the most green fingered person, but Tom enjoys watering and tending to plants, and now he has a helper in the form of Andrew!

Andrew (and Daddy) doing some watering
Andrew (and Daddy) doing some watering

So when I heard about the BritMums Kids Grow Wild challenge, through which we could grab ourselves a Little Pals gardening set, I knew this would be perfect for Andrew who is keen to help with the gardening. Unfortunately it didn’t arrive in time for Granny’s visit when she and Andrew did the actual planting into tubs of the seeds and plants that she had prepared for us, but Andrew has still has lots of fun watering every day with his very own watering can, and putting on the gloves as he inspects how the plants are doing (rather heavy handedly at times!)

Gloves on, inside and out!
Gloves on, inside and out!

The set comprises a bag with the perfect sized carry handles for little hands, a proper metal watering can, trowel and garden fork, a small pair of gardening gloves and some seeds. Andrew is very impressed, and often plays with the bag and gloves even when not gardening! We’ve left the trowel and fork outside in the high tubs out of his reach, as he’s only allowed to use them with our supervision – they are really very sturdy, and knowing him he’s probably do some serious damage if left to his own devices.

The Little Pals gardening set
The Little Pals gardening set

When Granny came with all her stuff, Andrew was very interested in helping her plant seeds and transfer plants to our tubs. I’m glad that he’s learning from an early age about how plants start off from seeds and grow. He didn’t quite get it at first that you have to wait and watch as they grow slowly – he expected them to grow immediately like on the Waybuloo app on Grandad’s iPad! But now he’s slowly realising, I think, that they are gradually growing and we have to wait before we can eat things from them. He keeps saying that he wants a bean when they are ready. Every evening when Daddy comes in from work, they go out on the balcony together and water the plants, each with their own watering can. Next year we can use the seeds that came in the Little Pals set, or maybe we can squeeze another tub onto the balcony this year, we’ll see!

Our tubs on the balcony
Our tubs on the balcony

How big is your garden? Hopefully this post will inspire anyone who thinks that their garden (or equivalent!) is too small to do much with – it is possible to have gardening fun, especially if you’re 2 years old! I’ll leave you with a video of us (well actually me: Andrew got camera shy) singing ‘I dig my garden’ – one of Andrew’s favourite songs to sing at the moment (when he doesn’t think anyone is listening/filming); he also recounts how he dug with Granny and Grandad, and shows his enthusiasm for his little fork 🙂

This post is an entry for the BritMums #KidsGrowWild Challenge – more details at 

The Little Pals set was sent to us free of charge. All views expressed are honest and our own based on our experience of using the set.

I’m also linking up to #CountryKids over at Coombe Mill’s blog.

Country Kids from Coombe Mill Family Farm Holidays Cornwall