A thought for Fathers’ day

One of the groups we go to regularly is called Little Sheep, which takes place at our church, Holy Trinity Cambridge, on Wednesday afternoons. There is an activity for all the parents to do (recent ones that spring to mind were making fresh pasta, making a magnetic fishing game for toddlers, coming up with and sharing present ideas for children of various ages, a clothes swap), and the children have fun playing with toys and are looked after by volunteers from the church. Anyone with children under 4 is welcome to go. Every week there is a ‘thought for the day’, which has been described as ‘a bit like the ones on radio 4 but less intellectual’! A few of the leaders and other mums who go to the church take it in turns to give the thought each week, and we are usually given a broad topic to talk on however we’d like. This week it was my turn, and my topic was Father’s day. So this is what I said…..

As it’s Fathers’ I’ve been asked to do a thought for the day on God being our Heavenly Father. A couple of weeks ago, the daily Bible reading and short study that I get sent by email was from the book of Romans (which is Paul’s letter to the early church in Rome), chapter 8. You can read the whole passage and notes here. Verse 15 in the passage says that ‘the Spirit [that’s the Holy Spirit] you received brought about your adoption to sonship. And by him we cry, ‘Abba Father.’

Now I’d read and heard this verse read many times before, it’s quite a well known one, often used to illustrate that God is not a distant Father but one who we can run to like a small child and he will be there for us – ‘Abba’ is the Aramaic (or Hebrew) word for ‘Daddy’ rather than the more formal ‘Father’. I love thinking of God like this, someone I can turn to for a hug if things aren’t going well, and someone who genuinely cares, just like a good father here on Earth cares for his children. I think this hits home to me even more now that I see Andrew running to his Daddy when he comes home from work, shouting excitedly “Daddy, Daddy!”, and his Daddy picks him up and gives him a big hug. That’s how God wants to be to us, and I imagine myself running to him shouting “Daddy” and him giving me a big hug.

Daddy and boys

Going back to the verse from Romans, the first part of it talks about our adoption to sonship through the Holy Spirit. I understood this on quite a superficial level before, and it always reminds me of a rather cheesy 80s worship song that has the line “Now I am your child, I am adopted in your family, and I will never be alone, cos Father God you’re there beside me”. But my study notes email a couple of weeks ago gave some background on what this meant in the context of the Roman Empire at the time that the events of the book took place and therefore what it would have meant to the original readers.

In first-century Rome, wealthy people would often adopt a young boy (who was often one of their slaves) to become their son. This adoption was a public act, and the boy received a new status and security, a new family and inheritance; an adopted son, unlike a biological son, could never be disowned or abandoned, and he could go to his adoptive father whenever he wanted. So when Paul, the writer of this letter to the church in Rome, uses the word ‘adopted’ when talking about these early Christians’ relationship with God, the same is true, and the same is also true for anyone who believes in Jesus today: God is our Heavenly Father who has adopted us into His family – we have a new security in God rather than worldly things, a new family including all the other Christians in the world, and our new inheritance is a new life in Jesus that lasts beyond our life on this earth.

This analogy with Roman adoption isn’t something I knew about until the Bible study recently. And now that I do know this context, the meaning of the verse is even clearer to me. I know that God will never abandon me. I know that I am blessed with a good relationship with my parents, but if that wasn’t the case, I imagine that it would be a great comfort to know that God my Heavenly Father would be someone to turn to.

Whatever your relationship with your own dad is this Fathers’ day – maybe it’s good, maybe it’s not, maybe your Dad isn’t around any more – wouldn’t it be amazing if you had someone even bigger and even better to run to calling ‘Daddy’ just like a child?

‘We love you Daddy’ mini heart-shaped cheese scones

So it’s the Saturday morning before Fathers’ Day, and I suddenly realise on an unrelated search through the fridge that we have 2 eggs that are at the day before their use-by date. This is probably because I’m doing less baking these days and I keep forgetting to do boiled eggs now that Andrew seems to be not so keen on scrambled but will eat boiled. Tom and I hate throwing away food, and very rarely do it – as we live so near the shops and do most of our shopping by foot or bike, we buy fresh stuff every few days and only as much as we need. So I was not going to let these eggs go to waste. I’m still not exactly back into baking like I was, but if it was bake or throw away food, I know which I’d rather do. As I’m generally feeling pretty good these days in the morning, I set about thinking up a recipe (or what turned out to be two) which would use the eggs up, and, to kill another proverbial bird whilst I was at it, bake something I knew Tom would particularly enjoy as a Fathers’ Day treat.

Given that Tom likes pretty much anything edible, I had quite a free rein on that front. The main factor in deciding on recipes was of course they had to have egg in. As my sweet tooth has yet to return from the pregnancy taste changes, I thought I’d give a savoury recipe a go. I flicked through some books to get inspiration, and the scones in good old Delia Smith grabbed my attention. I love a good cheese scone, so that was one egg decided on. For what I did with the other you’ll have to wait for another post.

Here’s the recipe that I used. It’s roughly based on Delia’s, but I always adapt recipes to suit our tastes and cupboard/fridge contents. I went for a ‘mini’ size so they would be easy for Andrew and also good as a snack. The heart-shape was supposed to be a sign for ‘We love you Daddy’ and we’d like to thank you for all you do.

Ingredients

  • 75g wholewheat flour
  • 75g self-raising flour
  • 25g margarine
  • 100g mature cheddar, grated
  • 1 egg
  • 3tbsp milk
  • 1 pinch cayenne pepper
  • 2 pinches cumin seeds

Method

  1. Rub the margarine and flours together in a bowl using your fingers, until it looks like bread crumbs.
  2. Stir in the cayenne and cumin until evenly distributed.
  3. Mix in about 3/4 of the cheese until evenly distributed.
  4. Beat the egg and 2/3 of the milk in a cup, then add it to the other ingredients, and stir until it forms a stiff dough that you can roll into a ball. If it’s too dry, add a bit more milk.
  5. Flatten out the dough on a floured surface to about 1cm thick, and cut out scones using a biscuit cutter. I used a small heart-shaped one, to make the mini scones as a ‘we love you Daddy’ treat 🙂
  6. Place the scones on a lined baking tray.
  7. Brush them with the rest of the milk, then sprinkle with the rest of the cheese.
  8. Bake in the oven at 180ºC until golden brown.
  9. Let cool and eat as fresh as possible.

We had ours with tomato soup, which worked brilliantly. In fact Tom liked them so much he ate most of them in one go! Andrew and I just about got a look in. I hadn’t expected them to be that popular, even knowing his appetite. He said his excuse was that they’re best eaten on the day of baking. I said he didn’t need an excuse – they were his treat!

For Fathers’ Day: Thanks Daddy

I have to admit, Fathers’ Day did creep up on me a bit unawares this year. I don’t know whether it’s because I’ve been shopping less than usual because of the pregnancy sickness and tiredness, but I guess I usually rely on the shops bombarding me with signs that it’s (not so) nearly Fathers’ Day. Anyway, I was in the supermarket the other day and realised I’d done nothing about it. None of the cards there particularly grabbed me as suitable for Andrew to give to Daddy, so I thought I’d try and squeeze in a bit of easy craft time whilst Andrew was napping one day, and come up with a card. I knew I wouldn’t get time to make one for our dads too (sorry Dad if you’re reading this…) so we bought them another day in town. Here’s what I knocked together in less than an hour before the giver of the card woke up….

Thanks Daddy for... ...reading books to me (an opening book), ...taking me to the park (a slippery slide - pretty simple design but hopefully gets the point across!) ...
... and most of all changing all those nappies! (and putting them in the washing machine!)

The inspiration for the nappies idea came from another mummy blogger and artist, Aly.

For Father’s day itself tomorrow, we’re going to a family fun afternoon at Tom’s workplace (King’s College, Cambridge), organised by the students for the staff and their little ones. It looks to be a fun thing to do, and it was Daddy who suggested we do it, so I hope it’ll be a fun thing to do together to celebrate Fathers’ Day. There will be a bouncy castle, face painting, games, a barbeque (not sure I’ll be so into that) and much more. Andrew might be a bit young to appreciate everything, but I’m sure the atmosphere will be fantastic. Are you planning anything special for Fathers’ Day? Hope you have fun and that any Dads involved feel appreciated.