Wembury rock pools – #CountryKids

Last week I wrote about our trip to Mothecombe beach in Devon when we were on holiday. That’s a mostly sandy beach on an estuary with lovely shallow water until quite a way out from the shore. Another day of our holiday we went just 5 minutes drive down the road from the edge of Plymouth to Wembury beach. Since the great storms that hit the south west coat last year, this has been a very rocky beach, and when it’s low tide, it’s perfect for a spot of rock pooling.

Andrew had spotted the old net in Grandma and Pop’s shed with the other beach toys earlier in the week and was desperate to have a go with it. So we’d promised him a morning at a rocky beach to try his hand at rock pooling. Unfortunately the net that was once Daddy’s had seen better days, so we treated him to a brand new one from the cafe on the beach, and it was very reasonably priced considering we were a captive audience.

Wembury 1

When we arrived it was pretty much bang on low tide and there were lots of fantastic pools. We all set out across the rocks, wearing sensible shoes (wellies for the boys) and carrying our net and buckets. Joel is a keen climber, so was also in his element, even though he wasn’t in the least bit bothered about looking for animals. Andrew wanted to use his net when we spotted a few things, but the kinds of creatures that we saw really needed an adult with a faster hand and a better eye for catching them as they were too quick for him. We didn’t actually catch much in the end – this shrimp was the highlight really, and we let him go back home after a few minutes.

Wembury 2

We did see lots of limpets clinging to the rocks, and barnacles, and anemones which I said looked like shiny cherries on the rocks. We saw lots of little crabs too, but they were too small to catch in our net.

Wembury 3

Joel was a bit of a handful really, and soon got tired so had a tantrum about not being able to go it alone across the rocks! It’s an activity that he’ll need another couple of years to appreciate fully. Andrew was keen to give it a go though, even if he couldn’t do lots himself. We’ll definitely be back here in future years. There is also a fantastic marine study centre just off the beach at Wembury, which is open to the public and you can have a look round at the exhibit telling you all about the sea plants and creatures of the area. Again, a bit lost on our boys for now, but give them a few years and I’m sure they will be very interested.

Wembury 4

Linking up with the fantastic Country Kids linky over at Coombe Mill’s blog.

Country Kids from Coombe Mill Family Farm Holidays Cornwall

Mothecombe beach – #CountryKids

The weather forecast for the week that we were on holiday in Devon wasn’t as amazing as it had been earlier in the summer, so we decided to go to the beach on our second day there, the best looking day of the forecast, just in case we didn’t get another chance.

Grandma and Pop had recently invested in a new blow up dinghy, since the one that Daddy and his siblings used to uses kids finally bit the dust last year when we were on holiday. One of the best beaches for small children that we’ve been to near their house is Mothecombe – the beach on the Erme estuary is fantastic, because it’s so shallow, you have to go out a long way before you can’t stand up any more as an adult, and at low tide, you can walk across the estuary so it’s not even deep enough to swim in. This makes it ideal for a row in a dinghy with little ones.

We got there quite early and were the first ones on the beach. Not surprising given that it was spitting slightly with rain, though was fairly warm still. We found a good spot and got our various bits of entertainment out – buckets and spades, bats and balls, football, kites, sand castle flags, and of course the boat with pump and oars. Pop and Daddy set to and blew up the boat, while the rest of us played in the sand and paddled in the sea – it was high tide so there wasn’t as much beach then as there was later in the day.

Once the boat was in working order, the boys both went out a few metres from the shore with Pop rowing, They absolutely loved it, and wanted to keep doing it several times for the rest of our time on the beach that day. Most of us adults had a turn to be in the driver’s / rower’s seat with either one or two boys with us.

Mothecombe 1

We had lots of fun doing all sorts of activities on the sand and in the water. Joel was quite happy to sit and play with the sand, putting it into buckets with his hands and throwing it about. It’s the longest I’ve seen him sit doing something for a while. Of course he did get up and play too, and also destroy Andrew’s sand castles, as is typical behaviour for each of them.

We had the obligatory British picnic lunch on the beach too, although at that point it was clouding over and just after we’d eaten we had a short and light rain shower, similar to a few that we’d had earlier in the morning, but it was the kind of shower that by the time you’d got a coat on, it was over and sunny again. The boat came in useful as a shelter for the boys though, with an adult at each end holding it up!

Mothecombe 2

Joel was getting tired after lunch, but we’d decided to see if he would have a nap in the buggy as everyone else was having a lot of fun. And he actually did fall asleep during a short push in the buggy. That gave the rest of us a chance to have a rest too, except those who were taking it in turns to row Andrew in the boat.

By about 3pm, the tide was about half way out and there was much more beach, not that we had to share it with many people because it wasn’t very busy at all. Andrew and I went on a walk along the estuary shore, and got to the bit where you can walk across at low tide. We could have walked across then, because there was only a shallow bit of water to walk through, but we knew there wasn’t too much time left on the beach because we had to get back home for 4.30pm. So we walked back across the beck, following the footprints that we’d made on the way. Except when we were not quite back, we saw a sand bank higher than the water level out to sea slightly. So we waded through the shallow water, and came to our very own ‘island’ that had no footprints on yet. Then it was just a short walk back through the water to the part of the beach where the others were sat.

Mothecombe 3

Gradually we packed up all our stuff and set off up the hill to the car park. Joel stayed asleep until we got to the car, and Andrew fell asleep in the car! It’s the sign of a good day when Andrew naps these days. I’d definitely recommend Mothecombe beach for little ones. It’s so quiet, not many people seem to know about it, or would rather not have the walk down (and up) the hill to (and from) the beach, but we think it’s worth it.

Linking up with the fab Country Kids linky over at Coombe Mill’s blog
Country Kids from Coombe Mill Family Farm Holidays Cornwall

Pennywell farm – #CountryKids

When the boys’ Grandma asked people with small children where are some good places to go with little ones in the area local to them, most people said Pennywell Farm near Buckfastleigh in Devon. It’s been going for 25 years, but they hadn’t been as a family when Daddy and his brother and sister were little, so we decided that we had to try it out. And it turned out to be an amazing day out. We went on a day that we knew didn’t have a fantastic weather forecast because although lots of it is outdoors, there is quite a bit of indoor stuff too.

The first area that we came to once we’d paid our entrance fee was the guinea pig pens. There were some benches where you could sit down, put a blanket over your knees, and have a hold and stroke of a guinea pig. Andrew was keen to have a hold, so did so with some help. The guanine pigs were very tame and happy to sit and be stroked. Joel was less keen!

Pennywell 1

Then we walked around the main yard in the centre of the farm, and saw various animals in their pens, like sheep, alpacas, shire horses, goats and more. The boys were happy to be able to see them all through the fences and the animals were obviously used to kids poking about. Soon we heard a bell ringing and a lady announcing that lamb feeding was about to begin in the main barn, so we headed over and got a seat on some of the hay bales in the tiered seating in the barn. It was a great view of the feeing pens. She explained that these lambs couldn’t be fed by their mummies because a ewe can only care properly for 2 lambs, so if she has more, then the littlest/weakest/daftest ones get kicked out the way and don’t always survive. So these were those types of lamb, and were being bottle fed on a mixture of goat’s milk from the farm goats and sheep formula milk. I was very interested in this lactation information! Andrew got to hold one of the bottles, though Daddy had to help because the lamb was very strong and pulled hard on the teat when sucking.

Pennywell 2

Just past the main barn was a smaller barn where the Pennywell miniature pigs were. Apparently these were bred at Pennywell for their small and cuddly size. And you could see that they liked nothing more than getting lots of cuddles from the guests. We sat down on a bench and got to hold a pig between Andrew and me, and he loved being stroked, nearly falling asleep on my lap. Joel wasn’t that bothered, but was happy to run around looking at other animals.

We’d seen some children having donkey and pony rides, so we headed over to where the animals were standing and saw that we had to book a slot, so we booked one in for after lunch so that Andrew could have a go. We carried on and came to a covered area that had lots of ride-on tractors to play with. There were various sizes, right from little Joel-friendly ones with no pedals that he could sit on and push with his legs, to big Andrew-friendly ones that he was keen to pedal and steer (mostly avoiding obstacles/other kids on tractors/helping adults). Both boys absolutely loved this bit, so we ended up staying for a while and as there were picnic tables right next to it under the covered area, we decided to eat our lunch there too. Next to the tractors were also some toy ride-on ponies, and Andrew figured out that to make them go you had to bounce up and down on them with your fit in the stirrups and they ‘trotted’ – ingenious idea for a ride-on I thought!

Pennywell 3

After we managed to drag them away from the tractors and ponies, we headed across to the other side of the farm, where there was a tall tower with a fabulous view over the moor to the north, and a playground. We also heard the ‘choo chop’ of a train and then spotted the sign for the ‘Rainbow Railway’. This train was just the right size for a ride with toddlers and preschoolers, and Andrew was very happy that he got to be the driver and the rest of our family sat in the carriages.

On our way back from the railway, we stopped and looked around the ‘funky foul’ area where there were all sorts of chickens and the like – some with very funky hair dos! By that time, it was nearly time for Andrew’s pony ride, so we headed back to the main yard. There was an owl display going on just near the pony park, so we managed to see some of that while waiting for the pony. The man was explaining all about how owls fly, hunt and eat their prey.

Pennywell 4

Finally came the time for the pony ride, and Andrew took to it very well. The pony’s name was Yarter and she was 17 years old. He had a ride around the main yard and up towards the tractor rides and back round again near the owl display.

By the time the pony fun was over, Joel was getting very tired, having walked around most of the farm himself. Even though we hadn’t done everything on the farm, we decided that that was enough for one day. It’s such a great day out for little ones, and even slightly older children. I think for what you get, the entrance fee is very reasonable, and we need to go back again to see what we couldn’t see in one trip. It’s definitely something I’d recommend if you’re in the area.

Linking up for the first time in a while to the fantastic #CountryKids linky
Country Kids from Coombe Mill Family Farm Holidays Cornwall

Devon holiday – part 3: Around Plymouth, parks & swimming

This is my fourth and final post about what we got up to on holiday this summer. First I blogged about our day trip to Coombe Mill, then I wrote about our brilliant National Trust days out, and our days at the beach. This week’s post is all about the days we spent closer to home, visiting places that Tom went to as a child, and seeing how they’ve changed (or not!) down the generation.

The weather on the Thursday didn’t look too promising, so we decided to stick close to home and head to Plymouth Hoe for a walk around the sea front and go to the park on the west side of the Hoe area. Part of the fun was getting the boat across the Sound from Mount Batten to the Barbican rather than driving into the city centre. Andrew loved this experience, and was keen to sit on the top deck of the double decker ferry! When we got off the boat, we walked around the Hoe at toddler pace – he jogged and we followed! When we got to the lighthouse at the top, we stopped for a break and had a drink in the cafe, before carrying on to our special destination…. West Hoe Park, home of Gus Honeybun and his train.


Now I had never heard of Gus, a rabbit. Tom explained that he was the mascot for the local ITV broadcasting station back in the 1960s-1990s. There is a little train ride for kids in the park that to this day has Gus riding around on it. Just like his Daddy did years ago, Andrew was thrilled to see this train in action, and was keen to jump on and have go himself (at only 50p each I thought it was a bargain!) Train madness runs in the family.

Plymouth 1

Also at the park was a bouncy castle, which Andrew had fun on for a while, though we all decided that it was time for a picnic before he got over hungry – he still doesn’t quite get that you have to keep your energy up when running around outside, and if he’s not reminded to eat it all ends in tears, literally! After we’d replenished our energy, it was time for the playground, where both boys had a go on the swings and slides, and Andrew did some climbing.

Plymouth 2

He’d also spotted another part of the park that had rides and games suitable for toddlers to early teens – a crazy golf course, ride on cars and boats, remote control cars and boats, diggers, trampolines, and panning for ‘gold’. He really wanted to go on the boats, so the grandparents bought him some tokens and I volunteered to go on the boat with him – it was slightly more ‘spinny’ than I normally like, but he thought it was hilarious and his roars of laughter were enough to make me laugh out loud too! After that we explained that he had some more tokens so he could go on something else – he chose a ride on electric car. The sign said that young children should be accompanied by an adult, so Pop was volunteered to ride on with him (I was still recovering from the boat ride and Tom had Joel asleep on his back in the sling). Andrew chose a sports car, so Pop could sit on the spoiler at the back and help with the steering – that was the plan at least, but Andrew refused to let him help, so we watched a hilarious 5 minutes of Andrew pretty much singlehandedly driving a car around the track and Pop looking petrified!!

Plymouth 3

Having survived that ride, the next one he wanted to try was the diggers, and with a bit of help rom Daddy, he successfully scooped some gravel around the pit. After that he wanted to go back on the car track, so Grandad then had a turn with him, and then I was volunteered to go on one with him to use the last token we had. It was fun, if a little scary! But soon he was getting very tired, and had a rather loud tantrum at the fact that we wouldn’t let him slide down the final hole of the crazy golf course where other people were trying to play! So we encouraged him into the buggy for a ride in it to the boat, and he fell asleep as soon as we got home.

Plymouth 4

A couple of days later on the Saturday, our final day on holiday, the weather was also decidedly wet, and as we hadn’t been swimming yet all week, we knew this would be a good plan. Last year we’d enjoyed a good swim in the brand new Plymouth Life Centre, which has a 50m swimming pool, leisure pool and diving pool (Tom Daley’s home territory!), so we went there again. Unfortunately so had everyone else, understandably as it was a wet Saturday in holiday season, and the leisure pool was full with a waiting list for another hour or so. Instead we went into the main pool, which they had roped off into various sections – some for swimming lengths and some for families with kids to play in.

Both boys loved it, despite it not being the warmest of pools that they have swum in! Andrew had fun jumping in from the side repeatedly, and Joel was happy to kick around on his tummy whilst being passed between various family members. The boys’ uncle and aunts joined us too, so we were quite a party, and that meant that the adults could take it in turns to go and have a ‘proper’ swim, which I took full advantage of as I don’t get to go swimming for myself much these days and I miss it. There weren’t as many toys and floats as in the leisure pool, and Andrew kept asking if he could have some, but there were enough of us to distract him and keep things fun without the toys. Joel particularly liked it when I swam underwater and popped up in front of him suddenly – he jumped but laughed, several times!

Plymouth 5

The swimming pool is located in a large park called Central Park, and there is also a large playground with all sorts of climbing frames, swings, slides, water features, bouncers etc., which we had to go and try out too. Joel napped for this part of the morning, but Andrew was so excited with all the different things to do in the park. There was a notice board explaining that the playground had been designed to reflect the different continents in different sections of the equipment. I’d not seen this kind of plan behind a park before.

And that was the end of our summer holiday. We had a lot of fun, got up to lots of activities, and we’re already looking forward to going back next year and having some more adventures!

Linking up our adventures with the lovely Country Kids linky over at Coombe Mill’s blog

Country Kids from Coombe Mill Family Farm Holidays Cornwall

Devon holiday – part 2: Fun on the beach

Last week I wrote about the fun we had at some National Trust properties when we were on holiday in Devon with both sets of the boys’ grandparents. This week I’ll tell the tales of our beach days on holiday.

Our first day at the beach was the Tuesday, and the destination was Looe in Cornwall. Of course we had all the inevitable jokes about needing the loo and so on, much to Tom’s annoyance! The sky was quite overcast, but it was fairly warm and there was no rain forecast, so we’d decided that a beach day was worth a try, and this location was good for the other family members that we were going to meet there.

Looe 1

It wasn’t too far a drive, and when we got there it wasn’t too busy, with plenty of space to find a good spot to put down all the paraphernalia that between us we’d lugged from the car park through the town and onto the beach. Andrew was keen to get playing straight away, and wanted to put his little swim/wet suit on, which was definitely worth having so that he could flit between the sea and the sand without getting his normal clothes wet or getting chilly from having just trunks on.

Looe 2

The first activity of choice was building sand castles with the substantial range of buckets and spades that Grandma and Pop have – some left over from the 1980s-90s and some more recent acquisitions. We even had little sandcastle flags to complete the works of art. Joel also joined in, though probably destroyed more castles than he helped make, and he loved the texture of the sand, playing with it in his hands and feet. It came as quite a shock to him that he couldn’t eat it!

Looe 4

After a little while, Andrew wanted to go in the sea, so down he headed with Pop and his little dinghy. Andrew absolutely loved the sea, which was good to see because last year he wasn’t so interested in it. He was happy to ride in the little boat and then get out and splash in the waves which were just the right height for him. There weren’t too many other people braving the sea, which wasn’t surprising given that it wasn’t amazingly sunny to dry off and warm up when they got out. Joel had a little dip too, and was more keen on it than Andrew had been in previous years.

Looe 3

Other activities that we got up to during the day included eating a picnic and playing frisbee. Andrew was quite skilled at throwing the frisbee….backwards behind him! That caused a few near-miss incidents with the people located near us – thank goodness for the Great British windbreak! At about 4pm we headed home and the two boys fell asleep almost instantly as we got on the road.


Nearer the end of our week away, on Friday, we had another beach day out. The weather forecast said overcast in the morning but brightening up later in the day, so we thought we’d believe it and head to the beach. This time we chose a more local beach called Mothecombe, just along the coast from Plymouth heading eastwards. The main reason we went there is that it’s perfect for little ones because it’s on the estuary of a river (The Erne) and is therefore very shallow and sandy. Even at high tide, you have to walk out quite a way before you can swim properly as an adult, so it’s just the right depth of water for little legs to paddle in or get a dinghy in.

MC 1

We arrived at about 11am, and the tide was coming in and almost at its highest. So there wasn’t much beach at that point, but we were the only ones there, so we picked a nice spot and put all our paraphernalia down. The same kinds of activities as at Looe were requested by Andrew and suggested by the adults. This time we’d also brought the body board, another throw back from yester-decade. The waves were just right for giving Andrew a bit of a go on it. At one point he got carried along by a bigger wave than he expected and he came off, but when he resurfaced he was laughing, which was good to see. Joel had a bit of a dip again, and enjoyed sitting in the dinghy, though not so much being sprayed with water by Andrew.

MC 2

Joel’s favourite activity was trying to eat the sand, and he got annoyed whenever a well-meaning adult, who was put in charge of watching him, stopped him! We all also enjoyed flying or looking at the kite, which again had stood the test of time from Daddy’s youth. I even had a dip in the sea, though had to walk out quite far before I could swim properly. I’m not a big fan of swimming in the sea, despite loving swimming in a pool, mainly because I don’t like to think about what’s in it – jellyfish are a particular worry.

MC 3

The tide started to go out from about lunchtime, and gradually the beach got much bigger. At the same time, the clouds started to part and the sun came out in force. We walked over the sand to where the river was much narrower than it had been – at low tide it’s actually possible to walk to the other side as the river is so shallow and narrow. There were some rock pools, and the grandfathers had managed to find a net in the beach shop when they went to get a coffee for everyone after lunch, so Andrew had a go at finding some treasures – a sea snail was his best find, and it lived in a bucket until we went home and it got put back in the sea.

MC 4

When the time came to head home because the tiredness signs were coming thick and fast from the boys, Andrew wasn’t impressed and screamed all the way back up the hill to the car that he wanted to go back down to the beach. We tried to convince him with various reasons why we were going home and that we’d come back another day, but in the end the promise of an ice cream from the grandparents as he’d been such a good boy all day won him over. Again they fell fast asleep almost instantly on the way home – the sign of a great day out!

MC 5

Linking up with the fab Country Kids, as always!
Country Kids from Coombe Mill Family Farm Holidays Cornwall

Devon holiday – part 1: Outdoor fun at National Trust #specialplaces

Rather handily, Tom’s parents live in Devon, right at the end near to Cornwall, so every summer we go on holiday and stay with them. Everyone enjoys it because they get to see and play with the grand children, and we get a good rest with meals and washing provided. This year my parents came too, so the boys had a real fill of grandparent attention. We all had a lot of fun, and got up to lots of fun activities. The weather was pretty good for us, not that rain stops us, we just tog up anyway, but it’s nice to be able to get out and about in the dry. I’d definitely recommend all of the places we visited for young children, so if you’re planning on holidaying down that way with little ones, it may be worth taking notes….

This first instalment of what we got up to is all about the National Trust, which you can trust for a good family day out.

Having travelled down from the Midlands with Granny and Grandad on Saturday (we’d stopped for lunch at Tyntesfield, a National Trust property just off the M5 past Bristol, where we saw Gromit!), our first day for exploring was Sunday. We didn’t feel like driving too far, so decided on Antony House, a National Trust property just across the River Tamar into Cornwall. If we were to cross the river by bridge, there is quite a long drive around on the other side, so instead we got the ferry across to Torpoint, and Antony is just a mile or 2 up the road from there.

PicMonkey Collage (1)

We usually check the National Trust hand book or app for opening times, but as it was a weekend in the height of holiday season, I guess we didn’t think about it and assumed it would all be open from about 10.30-11am. As we drew up into the car park, there were only a couple of others there, and we noticed that it didn’t in fact open until 12 noon, and even that is only on Sundays in the summer – the rest of the year it’s only open mid week. After we thought about it some more, we remembered that this property is actually still lived in, so it’s completely understandable that they wouldn’t want the world and his wife pouring in every day all year round. But fortunately the woodland walk around the perimeter of the house’s gardens was already open, so we spent an hour wandering around the woods. There are two walks, signposted with green and blue arrows, which was perfect for Andrew who was happy to be our guide and look out for green arrows and point us in the right direction.

PicMonkey Collage (2) copy

By the time we’d done that, the house and gardens were open, so we headed in with our picnic and found a nice spot on one of the lawns. We ate a tasty lunch, despite the fact that Granny forgot to pack the cheese, which then became the joke of the holiday every time cheese or picnic came up in conversation! Andrew and Joel enjoyed playing on the grass too whilst we stayed in that spot for a while. I had also spotted a slide across on the grass over by the other side of the house, so we headed over there and Andrew, once he’d been brave enough to go down the slide once (it was an enclosed tube so not quite what he was used to), had a lot of fun going down it several more times in the next half an hour. Meanwhile Joel was happy to cruise around the story time benches watching Andrew occasionally.

PicMonkey Collage (3)

After all that activity we stopped off at the tea room for a cornish ice cream. The boys were getting tired by then, so we made our way slowly back to the car and headed home. The littlest one fell asleep in the car and the bigger one didn’t quite as it wasn’t a very long journey home, so he napped when we got back for an hour. Although we didn’t get to see inside the house, we had a thoroughly enjoyable day outdoors, taking advantage of the beautiful sunshine and the boys’ and our love of being in the fresh air.

PicMonkey Collage (4)

A few days later, on Wednesday, we had another trip to a National Trust property. This time we went even more local, to Saltram on the east edge of Plymouth. The weather had been very wet in the morning, though we still got to the local playground and then spent some time with Tom’s extended family over lunch. After the boys had napped, we got in the car and arrived at Saltram just as the weather was looking more promising. First we stopped by the duck pond to admire the cute ducks, ducklings and teenage ducks/ducklings. Then the plan was for Andrew to ride his bike and for us to walk around the extensive grounds, after Andrew took a quick detour into the playground before he discovered that he couldn’t very easily slide down the slide in his waterproof trousers that we’d suggested he wear in case of puddles underfoot (or underwheel).

PicMonkey Collage (5)

Andrew sped off down the track so fast that he left us way behind him. We took it in turns to try and catch him up, first Grandma and Pop, then Tom and me, while Granny and Grandad took care of Joel in the buggy. We really had to jog, or even run, to keep up anywhere near him. Occasionally he would slow down to look at something en route, like the cows in the field or a woody bit with ‘off piste’ cycling possibilities. The route goes through fields to begin with, then turns a corner to meet and run alongside the large tidal estuary of the River Plym. So at that point we made him stop and carry on next to us – the adults walking on the side of the path nearest the river and Andrew on the inside, though he kept trying to break the human barrier.

PicMonkey Collage (6)

The circular route led us back to the car, and we all headed home having had a good dose of fresh air and a brisk walk (or jog!) As always, even though we’ve been to both these places before, they didn’t fail to provide us with a good day (or afternoon) out. The next instalment of our holiday adventures will focus on the days we had at the beach.

Linking up with the lovely Country KIds linky again 🙂

Country Kids from Coombe Mill Family Farm Holidays Cornwall




Pregnancy diary: week 28 – holiday

This week we’ve been on holiday! And what a well-needed holiday it’s been. With all this being pregnant, looking after Andrew, working, editing, blogging etc. I was feeling very much in need of a rest. We’re very blessed to have Tom’s family living in Devon, so we can go and stay with them for holidaying down in the South West of England. This means it really is a holiday, as we get looked after, for example meals get cooked, washing gets washed, tidying up gets done, and Andrew gets entertained by people other than us, which is always a novelty for him. I think with very small children, it’s less of a holiday when you still have to sort things out yourself, and still do the cooking, cleaning, and even travelling around once you’re there.

Change of background from normal as we're not at home yet, though back soon. Looking very bumpy in this summer dress, about to head out for the day, and it looks like it'll be lovely weather again 🙂

I’ve never been into holidays where you just sit around or lie around – I like doing something for at least part of each day. When I was younger, most years we went on holiday to France camping as a family, and would spend the morning out and about exploring the local area, and then come back in the afternoon to the campsite where I would spend the rest of the day in the swimming pool. Since Tom and I have been together, our holidays have mainly been in the UK, all in places where there’s plenty of outdoors to explore, like Devon and the Lake District. Although it’s been restful this week, that doesn’t mean we haven’t been out and done lots of activities as well. We’ve been to the beach and played with a kite and sandcastles, done lots of walking (Andrew sometimes on the dinosaur reins, sometimes in the back carrier, sometimes in the buggy) and been swimming. Generally the weather has been just right – not too hot, but also dry (apart from the odd shower) and only one really wet day (which we spent at the swimming pool and visiting family).

Collecting stones at Wembury beach. It turned out much better weather that day than we were expecting, so Andrew had joggers on instead of his swim stuff - it didn't seem to bother him though!
Trying to keep him out of the sea as he didn't have his swimming stuff on at that point, and it wasn't a particularly hot day!
Stuffing a jaffa cake, whole, into his mouth. Jaffa cakes are clearly the best part of any picnic!

The general routine has been to get out and about in the morning, have a picnic lunch somewhere, and then head back in the afternoon when Andrew naps (either in the car on the way back or at home) and we rest, and then do something locally in the late afternoon before dinner. This has been just right for me at this stage of pregnancy. I know that keeping active is really good for me, and I always feel much more energised when I’ve done some activity, even if I feel low on energy beforehand. I think that keeping fit in pregnancy was a big factor in how smoothly labour went with Andrew, and I’m determined to do the same this time in pregnancy. It has of course been lovely to have times of rest, when I can really rest, have a snooze, do what I like, rather than doing housework (or feeling bad about not doing housework because I did have a rest!)

A spot of croquet on the lawn at Saltram House. I don't know, we come all this way, and Andrew wants to play what is everywhere in Cambridge!
Daddy and Andrew having fun on a rope swing at Saltram House.

Andrew seems to have enjoyed his second holiday in Devon too. We came last summer, but he was only 6 months old, and didn’t really have much of a clue what was going on. This time he’s been able to take part in all we’ve been doing, and he’s pretty flexible with things like eating and napping, so we’re not tied to very strict timings in his routine. It’ll be even more fun this time next year, when there’ll be two little ones to entertain on holiday! Baby will be about 9 months old, so a bit older than Andrew was on his first trip down to Devon. I think that’ll be even more of a great reason to holiday in a place where we all get looked after!

Andrew enjoying a dinghy ride at Mothecombe beach.
I know it looks like he's running out to sea on his own, but it's shallow for miles as it's a river estuary, and we were just behind him in case of tripping up. He loved it in the shallow water with few waves.

This week should have been my 28-week appointment with the midwife and also my glucose tolerance test (to check whether I have gestational diabetes). But as we’ve been away all week, that wasn’t possible of course. So next week I’ll write about how those went, as I’ll have them at 29 weeks instead. I don’t think it really matters if you don’t have them bang on 28 weeks, because, after all, babies aren’t all born exactly on their due date, so mums don’t all end up being checked-up/tested at exactly the same stages of pregnancy. It seems like ages ago since I last saw the midwife – 16 weeks I think. But time is flying, and we’ll be into the thirties weeks very soon. There must be more posts on preparation that I’ll write, although I don’t think I’m half as aware of preparation for this baby as I was with Andrew at this stage in pregnancy, mainly because there is a lot less to do, as we have lots of ‘stuff’ for baby already this time. There are still a few things that I need to get organised with though, and I’ll let you know when I’ve done something about them!