When I’m 4 I might listen – wot so funee?

At the end of last week’s wot so funee? post I wrote about the evening that some friends came for a barbecue. Andrew got to play with the little girl of the family, who is a year older than him, and really enjoyed having an older play mate rather than his younger brother for a while. The following day he asked where she was, and I said that she’d had to go home. He asked where she lived, and I had to explain that she was currently staying in Cambridge, but that she actually lives a long way away in Australia. Later that day he mentioned her again, and told me: “Rosie lives in Our Stralia”… so I explained again that it was a long way away, the same place that Granny and Grandad visited a little while ago and we found them on the world map on the computer, but I’m not sure he’d remembered that.

With this continued warm weather, Andrew has been keen to hand out ice creams in the garden (shuttlecocks with various colours of soft play balls on top for the different flavours). He’s still not quite mastered how to say vanilla – we’ve had “manilla” and “vermilla” quite a bit – but this week we also had “Brum-illa” too. I think all this talk of moving to Birmingham has gone to his head.

I also think that all this warm weather had got to his head when he was pretending to catch a train and exclaimed: “I’m going to get on the plat-warm” He knows it’s a platform, we’ve read goodness knows how many Thomas books and seen the DVDs, and recently been on the train ourselves a few times, so I put it down to a heat-related slip of the tongue.

Another bonus of sunny weather is that it creates shadows. Andrew is very interested in shade and shadow, and we’ve had a few conversations about what it is and why we get shade and shadows. He’s keen to point out his own shadow when he sees it, and one day in the garden this week, he suddenly came out with: “I think Mr Pigeon is getting a shadow” when pointing at a rather fat pigeon who was pecking at the seeds on the ground.

We’ve had the paddling pool out permanently since the end of last week, and both boys love splashing about in it, and chasing me around the garden wielding pots full of water, then throwing them at me (not actually getting me very wet because most of the water has escaped by then with all their running!) This has temporarily silenced Andrew’s plea to go to the “gym swim” with Granny and Grandad. They once or twice took the boys to the swimming pool at the gym where they are members when we were house hunting at the start of the year, and for some reason Andrew suddenly remembered this the other day and hasn’t stopped going on about the fact that he’d like to go again. We’ve told him that they will take them again one day, but so far this hasn’t happened and he is still keen. Apparently, “Joel is desperate to go to the gym swim”, and Daddy was told one morning when he went into the boys’ room to get them up that “I was just telling Joel that we can’t go to the gym swim today, but maybe ‘nother day.” I’m sure when we’re over at the new house one weekend, Granny and Grandad will take them, but whether Andrew’s patience will be up by then is another matter.

And finally, a classic threenager conversation between Andrew and me when I was trying to get him to put his clothes on so we could go out (he seems to think that clothes aren’t necessary for public outings incidentally).

Me: Andrew, please can you put your pants on!! (for about the bazillionth time!)

Andrew: [carries on playing with rocket]

Me: [at the end of my patience] Andrew, will you listen to me?!

Andrew: When I’m 4 I might listen. And then I won’t be stressing.

That told me! I’ll look forward to his 4th birthday then, maybe it won’t take us hours to get out the door in the morning as I won’t have to chase around after him with a pair of pants! I won’t get my hopes up though, he only said *might* 😉

Wot So Funee?

Birds don’t have rain coats – wot so funee?

This week seems to have been a bumper week for funees, or maybe I just remembered to write more of them down?! Let’s start with a few animal ones. When we were at the garden centre (which has a very reasonably priced and nice soft play), we did our usual tour of the pets corner and saw some fish, amongst other creatures. We usually see quite a few ‘Nemo’ fish there as Andrew calls them (not that he’s ever seen the film, but he knows who Nemo is), but this week Andrew spotted another noteworthy one: “Look Mummy, it’s a bit like Tiggler!” I had to stop and think – my first thought was Tigger (did it look like a tiger?! – not really), then I got it – Ah, Tiddler! Yes he looks a bit like Tiddler, though it’s been a while since we read that book.

Following on from the lion guinea pig of last week’s funee post, we were walking through the park one day and saw some dogs, as usual. Andrew spotted a little one that had short white fur with a couple of big black patches on it: “That’s a bit like a cow puppy!” I could see where he was coming from, it did look like a mini cow with that fur.

As I’m sure many people have experienced this week, we’ve been nipping in and out of the garden depending on the showers outside. On one occasion when we were outside and it started to rain, I said to Andrew that we should go inside because it was starting to rain and we had no coats on. His reply, with a look of ‘but why mummy?!’, was thus: “But the birds are staying out mummy, and they don’t have coats on!” True, very true. I didn’t quite know how to come back from that one.

The rain was well and truly set in on Saturday when Daddy took the boys into town to another soft play centre that he found by googling which I hadn’t thought of before, even though I’ve driven past it many times when I used to live here myself. At dinner time later that day, Daddy was telling me all about his fun with transporting the boys from the car to the centre in the pouring rain – including how he forgot to put Joel’s coat on at first so had to get him back down off his back in the sling and put him back up, which he’s less practised at than me. Anyway…. in the middle of this conversation between the 2 of us, bearing in mind that it was heavily based around the theme of rain, Andrew piped up with: ”I had a leak!” It took us a moment to figure out that he actually meant “I had a leek!” (which is a rare event for him, and indeed there was a slightly smaller pile on his plate than when we started our conversation). It was an unfortunate, yet funny, homonym for that situation.

Here are the token foodie funees for this week. Wotsits create a lot of mess, as I’m sure any parent who has given them to a young child will attest. Andrew had finished eating a packet and of course had orange cheesiness all around his mouth and on his hands. When we pointed this out to him, his reply was a very matter of fact: “That’s the problem with the crisps.” He was right, and that was that. Sometimes Andrew asks for a snack if he’s hungry and there isn’t any sign of a meal coming up (he sometimes asks when there is a meal in sight too). One day, when I was sorting out a few things from my bag when we’d got back from a group at lunch time, Andrew was getting a little impatient for lunch and came out with: “I’d like something to get me going!” It took me a moment to realise that he meant ‘keep him going’.

On Sunday we had some friends come for dinner – the boys’ Godmum along with a family who we haven’t seen for a long time and the daughter is exactly a year older than Andrew so they got on very well playing together. After we’d had dinner, I suggested to Andrew that he and his friend go into the other room and play with his ‘big boys’ toys’ and let the little ones play with the general toys in the living room where we were. His friend’s mum asked her too if she wanted to go and play with the toys in the other room. Andrew stopped, looked at his friend’s mum and said “what do you say?” , as if to imply “should there be a ‘please’ in there?” Of course we all laughed at his cheekiness, and I said to him that that was a bit cheeky! He turned around and insisted “No! It’s not cheating, Mummy!” By this point we were all in fits of laughter, and off they went into the other room to play with play dough, Thunderbird toys and other games.

Wot So Funee?

The lion guinea pig – wot so funee?

I know there was a series of wot so funee? posts that I wrote a while back which were always mentioning Thunderbirds. Well Andrew is still very into Thunderbirds and playing with his Tracey Island and Thunderbird toy rockets etc., but he’s expanded his repertoire to other Gerry Anderson puppet series. His favourite one to talk about at the moment is Joe 90, which I don’t think so many people have heard of. That is my impression at least when Andrew starts jabbering on to random strangers (admittedly other parents at groups and activities that we do) about his knowledge of Joe 90. They usually smile and nod and say the usual ‘oh right, that’s good’ kind of phrases that we parents do when we can’t understand another child. I think his speech itself is clear, but they don’t always understand who Joe 90 is or why Andrew is talking to them out of the blue about him. It’s quite hilarious seeing him do this to unsuspecting people who don’t know how to react. He’ll talk to anyone and everyone, no hesitation.

It’s not just strangers who get bombarded with an earful of jabbering from our little chatterbox. Grandad took him in the car on Sunday, just the 2 of them, to pick up Great Grandma. He didn’t stop chattering the whole time in the car apparently, and of course insisted that they listened to Joe 90 on the CD player, on repeat, several times! Still, I can’t feel too sorry for Grandad – it’s his fault that Andrew is obsessed with Gerry Anderson puppetry.

Now that Andrew himself is well and truly toilet trained in the daytime, he finds it funny when Joel has a dirty nappy. He’s particularly vocal about describing the mess when he sees it. I’m usually too busy trying to pin Joel down to clear him up before he runs off and gets it everywhere to really take much notice of how Andrew is reacting, but I managed to note down a classic that came out when Daddy was around too: “It’s a disgusting spready weddy poo!” A toddler technical term there. I also liked how he described one of Joel’s nappies as a “displosion” the other day. It was certainly an epic explosion, so maybe a “displosion” is one step up on the scale of explosiveness?!

Moving on from poo (you know you’re a parent of young kids when you can write so glibly about poo), Andrew is still keen to make up his own verbs from nouns that he knows. He’s been doing this for quite a while now, and at the weekend he was on top form in the garden with various sports. He told Daddy to “just golf it!”, when he was trying to get him to hit the golf ball with the club (all plastic). And recently I’ve heard him talking about “tennis-ing the ball” – i.e. hitting a ball with a bat.

We know that Andrew is very good at milking sympathy when something is up. But just recently he’s been stepping this up a little too far in my opinion. A few times now he has been loudly in tears for some reason or another, maybe he’d hurt himself slightly or got annoyed about some (seemingly insignificant) occurrence, and then he has rapidly turned off the water works and stated quite openly “I’ve finished now” and got on happily with something else. Leaving me open mouthed at what he’d just done.

And finally for this week, an insight into his imagination as a 3 year old. We have a red cuddly toy in the car at the moment, which Granny kindly gave us from their car one day when the boys weren’t happy about getting in (it was after our recent beach trip and to be fair I’d have rather stayed longer too but we knew we had a long drive home). I think it was supposed to be a dinosaur for Comic Relief, as it roars when you squeeze it. One day this week, Andrew held it up when he was getting into his car seat and declared that “this is like a lion guinea pig!” I can kind of see where he’s coming from, but it did make me laugh out loud. What do you think?

Lion guinea pig

 

Wot So Funee?

Row, row, row your plane/fire engine/motorbike – wot so funee?

I’m a bit behind this week with blogging. With being away for the weekend and then the bank holiday, plus lots of orders and a craft fair keeping me busy sewing, I’ve not had much time to blog! But here are a few classic comedy moments from this past week…

We’ve been talking about moving house for quite a while. We have a house lined up, we just haven’t got the keys yet and we can’t move in until it’s decorated too, so for now we’re still living with Granny and Grandad who are very kindly not kicking us out. But I think Andrew is starting to wonder whether we’ll ever move out into our new house. As he, Daddy and Joel were walking down the road to the park the other day, he gave an insight into what’s going on in his mind on this matter. About 5 minutes walk from Granny and Grandad’s house is a house that is currently undergoing a big extension on the side. We’ve walked past it several times before, but on this occasion on their way to the park, Andrew stated: “When our new house is finished, we will live here!” I know we said we’d live nearer to Granny and Grandad, but we were thinking 25 miles rather than 250 metres.

When we do move house, I don’t think our post lady will mind as she will have fewer parcels to deliver on her rounds (I get quite a few small parcels delivered for the business) and she won’t get greeted by a naked 3 year old when I open our door. Most days we’re in when she delivers as it’s not normally until around 2pm that she turns up and usually Joel is napping then. But we did miss a parcel last week when we stayed out until after lunch, so the following day we drove to the delivery office to collect it. I think it blew Andrew’s mind when he saw how many post vans were parked outside the office (to be fair, there were probably around 30!): “Wow! There’s lots of postman pats here!!”

Another chirp from the back of the car came when we stopped to fill up with petrol at the weekend on our long journey. Daddy got out to do the filling up, and Andrew shouted across to him from his car seat: “How many petrols are you getting Daddy?” I’m not entirely sure how many litres our car takes, but I know it costs a fair amount to fill up these days, so I just said to Andrew that we needed a lot of petrol.

Cars are just one of Andrew’s favourite vehicles. He’s interested in anything with wheels really. One day this week I found he’d emptied a basket underneath his bed where we store his underwear and was sitting in it pretending it was a plane, holding out his arms for the wings. I laughed, and said maybe we could pretend it was a boat and sing ‘row, row, row your boat’. He wasn’t too impressed with this and shouted: “No! I want to do row, row, row your plane!” I laughed even more at that and said I didn’t think planes could be rowed. He pondered for a moment, then came out with: “How about row, row, row your fire engine then?…..Or row, row, row your motorbike?” By this point he was laughing whilst talking too, so we both ended up in fits of laughter together.

row your plane

Green fingered Andrew has been helping Granny with seed planting and care in her vegetable garden this year. One of the tasks is of course watering them (though this week they really don’t need it with all the rain, not that that stops Joel trying to ‘water’ them some more – i.e. tipping whole pots of water onto the soil). One sunnier day last week, Grany said to Andrew that the plants were thirsty and needed something to drink. He looked a bit puzzled and then exclaimed: “But plants don’t have mouths!” Fair enough, they don’t, and it’s a bit of a far-out concept to him to imagine how plants drink when they don’t have a mouth like he does.

That’s it for this week, but I’m sure we’ll be back with more hilarity next week 🙂

Wot So Funee?

Brummie fun – wot so funee?

Another week has flown by and another week of hilarity in the toddler/preschooler language department it’s been. Apparently Andrew is quite the expert at various activities/ subject matters these days: “No Mummy, Joel’s not the expert, I’M quite a bit of an expert at Peppa Pig!” Oh yes sorry of course you are! He’s also our resident sliding down the slide in funny positions expert, eating ice cream expert, throwing frisbees expert and many more experts, all by his own admission.

So whilst he is an expert at all these things, I, apparently, lack the expertise that it takes to give him and Joel a bath. One day last week, Daddy was late home from work because the trains were delayed. This hasn’t often happened since he started commuting that distance, but as it’s him who does the bath time normally, we missed him that night. As we were heading up stairs and I was explaining that Daddy wasn’t going to be here for bath, Andrew looked most upset and said: “I don’t want a bath with you mummy, you’re not very clever at baths!” So I may have a PhD but running a bath, washing them and playing with them is beyond me. Thanks!

Since Andrew gave up his nap a few months ago, we’ve been encouraging him to still have a rest and just sit quietly for an hour or so because he really gets very tired by tea time otherwise – but that’s easier said than done when you’re a wriggly 3 year old! He’s got quite into watching a DVD, which seems to be the best way to keep him still, though he still flits off and plays with other things every now and then whilst watching. Until Granny bought a couple more DVDs the other day, Shrek 2 seemed to be the only one he wanted to watch, and after watching it quite a few times, he started to pick up some of the lines and anticipate them whilst watching it, which is really quite funny to listen to. I had to laugh when he told me what was happening: “Prince Charlie is riding a horse, look Mummy!” Ah, that would be Prince Charming 🙂

A routine that the boys have become used to now is going in to Granny and Grandad’s room for half an hour or so in the morning whilst they get up and ready for work. The TV is often on, and one programme that they have all got into is Q Pootle 5. I haven’t watched much of it myself, but what I have watched is definitely on 2 levels: the kids see funny space aliens being silly, and the adults understand jokes and references on a whole other level. All the aliens have various regional British accents, as you might expect (?!), and the favourite in our house of course has to be Eddie the Brummie. In one particular episode he comes out with an absolute classic sentence for highlighting his Brummie accent: ‘Look at the state of that bunting!’ (just what you’d expect an alien to be saying isn’t it?!!) So we’ve been joking about this ever since they first saw it, especially when I made some bunting the other day for my sewing business. Stay with me, this isn’t the funniest bit yet, it’s just a long preamble to explain where the next bit comes from. We’ve been going to a few groups over in Birmingham and Solihull – nappy and sling meets mainly – to try and get to know people over there. Last week was the first glimpse that I had of Andrew recognising that many of the children we’ve met over there have accents different from his own. He was playing alongside a boy a little younger than him, and after a while came up to me and said very softly: “That girl is talking like bunting….like Eddie.” I tried not to laugh, (a) because actually I was quite amazed that he’d picked that up and could express it to me, and (b) because the girl was actually a boy with long hair. He’s still not figured that one out, despite me giving him the example several times that Uncle Pete has long hair and he’s a boy. I tried to suggest quietly that actually ‘she’ was a boy, but that was met with a our and indignant: “No it isn’t, it’s a girl!!” I think his mum may have overheard that one, whoops! I suspect that the boys will grow up with some degree of Brummie accent, so he’ll get used to it.

And now to finish off, we turn from Birmingham to a couple of references to the boys’ city of birth – Cambridge. When we were in town the other day, a lady shouted across to someone she knew standing not far from us: ‘Andrew!’ Of course my Andrew immediately said “Yes?”, and I then explained to him that she wasn’t talking to him but that there was another Andrew near us. His response was: “Ah there’s 2 Andrews…. no there’s 3 Andrews, there’s fireman Andrew in Cambridge as well!” This was something he remembers from quite a while ago, when he went out with Daddy one saturday morning and they got to see inside a fire engine which was stationed at some event somewhere, manned by a fireman called Andrew, which he didn’t quite get at the time when Daddy tried to explain!

One evening this week when the boys were having a bath, Andrew asked Daddy where the ‘pink water’ was. Daddy looked puzzled and asked him what he was talking about, so he explained a little more and Daddy then understood that he was talking about an old flannel that we used to have quite a while ago that was a deep red colour but when you put it in water it made the water go pink, which Andrew used to love in the bath. We don’t know what made him suddenly think of it again recently. Daddy explained that this flannel was from a long time ago when we lived in our old flat in Cambridge. Andrew pondered for a few seconds and then came out with: “Where is Cambridge now Daddy?” He had to laugh, and tell him that Cambridge is still in the same place that it’s always been, it’s just us that’s moved away. I still wonder if he thinks we’re just on one long holiday at Granny and Grandad’s house!

Wot So Funee?

Red submarine and nocular gifts – wot so funee?

I don’t seem to have noted down so many funee moment this week. I don’t think it’s because there were fewer, I think I just got out of the habit of writing lots down over the Easter break. But here’s what I have on offer from the hilarious world of a preschooler and his toddler brother this week….

Andrew has become quite interested in the various surfaces that cover the ground at playgrounds in parks. The ones near us are either sand or that squishy astroturf type stuff that’s soft to land on though gets everything covered in salt. But recently we visited a park a bit further away that has those dark brown bits of soft wood on the ground. Andrew asked what was on the floor, so we said that it was bark chipping. He took it in, and a few minutes later he declared that he liked the “bark chicken” on the floor.

When we were on holiday before Easter, we found ourselves in the inevitable National Trust gift shop. Until now, Andrew has always chosen a bouncy ball as his souvenir treat, particularly when Granny and Grandad are with us, because they started a mini tradition of buying him one at NT shops. But this time Andrew was rather taken by these weird rubbery neon creatures that were called caterpillars on the tag, but looked more like a millipede with lots of legs to us. So that’s what we called it. But all the consonants were a bit of a mouthful for Andrew – he finds ‘l’ quite hard still when there are other consonants to make in a word, it is a bit of a different sound to make in the mouth compared to others we have in English – so he decided to call it a “lilypede” whilst he tried to master the word millipede.

Andrew has a bit of a thing about having no clothes on at the moment – he loves it, and finds any excuse he can to shake them off and go bare. He also likes to run to the door whenever the bell goes, so a fair few postmen, delivery guys and general door knockers get a lovely surprise (enough to scare away any cold callers 😉 ) One of his excuses to start stripping clothes off is if they are at all wet, even just a few drops. And this is what happened one day when he was eating cereals for breakfast with just his pants and t-shirt on. I saw him starting to pull off the pants, so asked why. His response was a loud and indignant: “I just don’t like milk in my pants!!” Fair enough I guess, nobody likes milk in their pants now do they!

A while ago I blogged about the habit that he had gotten into of taking random things to bed with him. This phase passed at some point, but he still occasionally likes to pick up  objects that I don’t think of as particularly good bedtime hugging material. For example one morning this week I found him with 2 mini plastic golf flags from a toy golf set that he plays with outside. I have no idea how they came to be there!

Although Andrew’s speech is very understandable for his age, he still of course makes learner mistakes. Tricky tenses often catch him out, like when he explained that “I didn’t went through that door, I went through this door!” It makes perfect sense really, especially when ‘went’ was coming up in the next part of the sentence too. ‘Might’ can be tricky too, so earlier I heard him say “I might can do a standing-up wee” (he can do it, I think it was just that the toilet at the garden centre soft play was a bit too high for him).

Joel is starting to sign quite a bit now – his favourites are bird, aeroplane and Granny and Grandad. He’s understanding so much of what we say, even if he can’t say anything yet in speech. Of course we’re giving him lots of praise when he signs, and Andrew then points out that he can do the signs too. Of course you can Andrew, you’re 3 and can talk! He’s also taken to telling me what the French and/or German word is for what Joel is signing, to try and really impress me and get one up on lil’ bro 😉

And finally for this week, a random bit of speech that he just came out with the other day whilst we were eating breakfast together. He’d been sitting in silence, eating his Weetabix minis and looking like he was pondering something.

Andrew: When you grow up Mummy, you can have a red submarine

Me: Really?

Andrew: Yes, Grandad will buy it for you!

Me: Really?

Andrew: Yes, and we will buy a nocular for Grandad!

Me: Hmmm….right…..?!

Nocular is ‘binoculars’ by the way – he likes looking through Grandad’s and saw that you could buy them from one of Grandad’s bird watching magazines. And he’s into the Yellow Submarine at the moment, so I’m guessing the submarine reference is something to do with that. Young minds are hilarious!

Wot So Funee?

Stone cakes

You may be thinking that these are somehow related to rock cakes. They’re not. The name came about when Granny made some cakes a while ago that she filled with jam and cream, and so when Andrew came to ask what they were called, she said “well, I guess we could call them scone cakes Andrew, because they’re a bit like scones with jam and cream”. Since then, Andrew has remembered, or so he thinks, the impromptu name of these cakes! We say ‘scone’ to rhyme with ‘stone’, and as the word with ’st’ is a frequent word in his vocab, that’s what’s stuck in his mind.

IMG 2377

When it was showering outside one afternoon this week, I asked Andrew if he wanted to do some baking whilst we waited for the shower to pass before going in the garden. His reply was a very enthusiastic YES! When I asked what he wanted to bake, his request was ‘stone cakes’. So that’s what we did. The recipe is very simple – a basic sponge, with some raisins (like a fruit scone), with a filling of jam and buttercream. Like so many bakes, I find simple turns out to be very tasty, and is perfect for getting little ones involved.

Stone cakes Collage jpg

Ingredients

  • 120g sugar
  • 120g butter (or margarine – I usually use marg but butter is what Granny has in for baking at their house where we’re living still)
  • 2 eggs
  • 120g self-rasiing flour
  • 60g raisins

Filling

  • Strawberry jam
  • 100g icing sugar
  • 50g butter

Method

  1. Prepare a muffin tin with cake cases (9-10), and preheat the oven to 180 C.
  2. Cream the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy.
  3. Add the eggs and a little flour, to stop it curdling, and beat until well combined.
  4. Add the flour and raisins, and mix until the mixture is just combined and smooth.
  5. Spoon the mixture into the cake cases until 3/4 full.
  6. Bake for around 15-20 minutes, until a skewer inserted into the centre of the cakes comes out clean.
  7. Leave to cool completely.
  8. Meanwhile, cream the butter and icing sugar together to make the buttercream icing.
  9. When the cakes are cool, cut a small, round piece out of the tip of each one.
  10. Place a teaspoon of jam and 2 teaspoons of buttercream in each hole, then replace the piece of cake that you cut out, as a kind of ‘lid’ (that’s how I explained it to Andrew when he helped me make them!)
  11. That’s it, they’re finished! Eat and enjoy 🙂

IMG 2371

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Mini Creations

The ducks don’t work – wot so funee?

We’ve had a bit of a break from wot so funee? posts over Easter and then last week when all I blogged about nappies for Resuable Nappy Week. As I’m getting back to normal on the blog this week, it seems only right to write up the best of the funees from the past few weeks.

I’ve written before about thhe fact that Andrew says yesterday for anything in the past and tomorrow for anything in the future. Fair enough, he’s a bit young still to be understanding the concept of weeks, months etc. But recently he’s had a thing about saying “this year”, which I think is related to when we explain to him that this year he is 3, but next year he will be 4. So we’ve had: “It’s quite a sunny day this year” and “I want Granny and Grandad to come home this year” – I presume he’s just thinking logically that it must mean ’now’, from when we say it, though he does know ’today’ and mainly uses that but ’this year’ creeps in too.

We quite often go to the local park on bin day, which, apart from being a pain to get the buggy through the gap between wheelie bins and garden fences on the pavement, means we get a running commentary on what the bins are like from our little chatterbox. He has quite rightly noticed that some are smaller than others on one particular road that we walk along – “Those are children bins and those are grown-up bins!” Yes that’s right Andrew, a whole family of bins line up on this street every Monday morning!

When we were on holiday with his four grandparents, Andrew was keen to do lots of activities with them. This included wanting to take some pictures with Grandad’s camera. As Grandad knelt down to take a photo of a pretty flower in the park, Andrew asked “Can I have a do?” No that isn’t a typo – he asked for a do rather than a go. Which to be fair to him, makes total sense, because taking photos is something that we ‘do’ rather than ‘go’ anywhere with. He hasn’t quite grasped the phrase ‘to have a go’, where ‘go’ is a noun not a verb like he’s used to.

Having studied several other languages, I’ve often thought that I’m glad I learned English natively as a child – it’s just so full of irregularities and peculiarities! We take it for granted as adult speakers of a language that we know these, but they can be really confusing to a learner, whether child or adult. One of these irregularities Andrew demonstrated perfectly when we were feeding the ducks and other birdlife down at the shores of Derwent Water on holiday…

Adult (I can’t remember who exactly): Look there are geese and ducks here Andrew.

Andrew: Aha!

A few minutes later….

Me: Watch that goose! Don’t go too close to him, he looks nasty!

Andrew: It’s not a goose, it’s a geese!

Me: I know, that’s so confusing!

And I proceeded to try and explain that it was one goose and two/three/more geese. Stupid English!

Then there was the time on another day of our holiday that he toddled off with Grandad to go and feed the ducks some duck food that we’d bought earlier in the week. We were between Rydal Water and Grasmere next to a small river that had a few ducks hanging around on it. But when they came back, Andrew was most disappointed because the ducks there didn’t want any of his special food: “the ducks don’t work here!” I mean come on, what were they playing at? Surely any self-respecting duck would want to eat some food wielded by an enthusiastic 3 year old, wouldn’t they?

As I’ve written before, no wot so funee? post would be complete without a foodie funee or two. Both boys would probably say that pasta is their favourite food. Joel can’t talk yet, though he’s very into signing at the moment, but the non-verbal cues that he gives me are very clear, i.e. shove it in fistfuls at a time until his cheeks are stuffed like a hamster and he can’t chew it down fast enough! I whipped up a quick pasta and cheese dish one lunchtime, like I often do (to call it a ‘dish’ is a little OTT, it’s just pasta mixed with grated cheese until it melts). Andrew was very impressed with what I served up in front of him, and when he tried to pick some up with his fork, a big clump of pasta came up with the fork: “Look, the pasta is cheesing together!” I thought that was quite an ingenious way of describing it actually.

Andrew has been a bit fussy with fruit and veg recently, though he did eat 4 pears today – he has a bit of a thing about this fruit, he gets his 5 a day, it’s just almost all pear! But I’m trying to be persistent with raisins on his breakfast cereal, which he used to always have until he got fussy with it a few weeks ago. So I asked the usual one morning…

Me: Would you like some raisins Andrew?

Andrew: No, I don’t like the dead ones!

Right…. wot so funee about that?

Wot So Funee?

Don’t get Thunderbirds wrong! – wot so funee?

As I sit and start to type this post, it’s pouring with rain outside. To be fair, it hasn’t been too rainy recently, but it’s making up for it today. This seems a good point to start with a funee moment from when the boys were at the park with Daddy at the weekend. Andrew was standing on the ground and Joel was just above him on the climbing frame, looking down. Andrew looked up to the sky and said: “Is it raining Daddy?” And Daddy’s (honest) reply was: “No Andrew, it’s just Joel dribbling on your head!” This is quite normal for Joel – copious amounts of dribble are often seen escaping from his mouth, hence the need for mummy-made super absorbent dribble bibs.

As usual, we’ve been spending quite a bit of time in the garden this past week, especially when I was ill and it was the easiest thing to entertain the boys with, simply by opening the door and letting them run off steam without too much effort from me. Andrew is very into the game pictured here, though this was taken after Joel had knocked it down and put golf balls in some of the holes – little brothers can be SO annoying! Andrew has heard us say the name of the game quite a bit, but the other day he asked if we could play it before I mentioned any names…

Andrew: “Can we play forget 4 please?”

Me: “Forget 4??”

Andrew: “No wait…. cadet 4?”

Me: “Ah I think you mean CONNECT 4 Andrew!” 🙂

IMG 1785

The trees are starting to be colourful again, so we’ve been talking about spring and what this means in terms of tree life cycles. Granny and Grandad’s garden has a lovely (except when it sheds all its petals in one go) magnolia tree, which is currently making the lawn look like it’s been hit by a freak snow storm. To try and cheer me up when I was ill, Andrew came up to me and kindly offered me a petal: “Look, here’s a blossom for you Mummy! There’s lots of blossoms here.” Aw, cute that he thinks one petal is one blossom rather than blossom being the collective noun.

No wot so funee? post from me would be complete without a foodie funee (or several). Andrew often asks what’s for tea these days, and I get met with various reactions depending on my answer. Here’s what happened one day this week…

Andrew: “What we having for tea?”

Me: “Casserole Andrew.”

Andrew: “Oh…… Hmm…. I do like roll!” *moves hand around in a gesture the shape of a swiss roll* (I wish I’d got a video of the hand bit – that really made the funee at the time!)

There’s been a new cereal in the cupboard this week – ‘Copters’ by Kelloggs Coco Pops. Andrew of course thinks these are amazing because (a) they look like helicopter blades and (b) they turn the milk chocolatey which he can drink with a straw after he’s eaten the cereals. He sometimes has a bit of trouble remembering the shortened name though (he can say helicopter fine), so a few mornings he has asked for “hocters”.

I’ve mentioned several times before that Andrew (along with his brother) is very active. When he was tearing around the living room crazily the other day, Granny asked him: “Where so you get all your energy from? Can I have some?” His response was: “From a doctor!” Aha, now we know the secret – quick, let’s all go to this doctor for a boost! Of course it might also help that Andrew has access to secret Thunderbird powers. Like when he attaches two small mole cuddly toys to himself, holding them underneath his arms, and these become his super powerful engines that blast him like a rocket around the house. Yes, we’re still mad about Thunderbirds and rockets, no change there.

In fact he now thinks of himself as so clued up on Thunderbirds that he has the right to tell us off when we don’t get it right. One of Grandad’s favourite little sayings at the moment is ‘don’t get X wrong’, which apparently comes from Alan Partridge (who I believe said ‘don’t get Bond wrong’). Grandad uses it in the context of anything that is said wrongly – so he replaces X with whatever it might be. Of course Andrew, being the little sponge that he is, had soaked this one up without us knowing, that is until one evening this week when it became quite clear… The boys have a ‘routine’ for going up to bath, which (surprise, surprise) also includes Thunderbirds! Andrew pretends to be one of the Thunderbird rockets/vehicles and he assigns one to Joel too, then they each blast off upstairs in the manner of the chosen rocket. Except one evening Daddy got it mixed up, and called Joel Thunderbird 1 when he’d been assigned Thunderbird 3. Cue Andrew… “No! Don’t get Thunderbirds wrong!!” And it was said with intonation just like Grandad/Alan. We all creased up with laughter 🙂

And finally for this week, we have a lovely piece of art work from the budding young artist Andrew. After dinner one day he got down from the table whilst Joel was just finishing off his food. We could see that he was drawing something on his easel with chalk. When he stepped away we could see the finished design – ta da! Then I asked what it was. His reply (in a very ‘well don’t you know?’ kind of tone: “a banana!” Of course, I can see it now, a banana, silly me! (?!?)

Banana

Wot So Funee?

Biting the hand that feeds you – wot so funee?

So far my wot so funee? posts have mainly featured Andrew, eldest brother of two. This week, a particular interaction between him and younger brother Joel made me laugh out loud, even though Andrew didn’t find it particularly funny. Like a nice and kind big brother, Andrew offered Joel a mini cheddar biscuit from his packet. That was cute. Then things got cuter when he even offered to put it into Joel’s mouth for him. However, the cuteness faded when Joel took a chunk out of not only the biscuit, but also Andrew’s finger! Talk about biting the hand that feeds you! Andrew looked at me, lip wobbling and said: “Joel bit me!” Luckily he didn’t actually cry, so it can’t have been that bad. But it was just the face that said it all – why?? If you stick your fingers in a 16 month old’s mouth, you won’t come out unscathed!

Moving on to a different kind of food – one you don’t have to bite: ice cream. We had this as a yummy treat for pudding the other day, and when asked which flavour he’d like out of vanilla or ginger (it was fancy stuff!), his reply was: “I’d like miller”. Once again Andrew demonstrating perfectly a phenomenon common to English-learning kids: picking up the stressed syllable (and the one after it) but not the preceding unstressed syllable – so he heard ‘nilla > miller.

Apart from ice cream, Andrew loves bananas. A taste he shares with Daddy but not me. He was eating one the other day, and Grandad thought he would be funny and call Andrew a monkey, joking at the fact that he was eating a banana. But this didn’t go down too well… “I’m not a monkey [sad face]….I’m a rocket!” See, it always has to come back to rockets. And there was us all thinking he was a boy.

I’m sure Andrew isn’t the only 3 year old who is easily pleased. There are several things in life that make him happy, and none of them or very expensive or complicated. For example, the other day when we were driving along, he randomly came out with: “Windy things make me happy!” After a little more probing, it turns out he was talking about windmills, probably the kind that we had on our balcony in bright colours. No idea where that came from!

Another thing that makes him happy is playing for endless hours in the garden – or the “ball garden” as he calls it (Granny and Grandad’s garden where we are currently living). One afternoon we were playing out there, and Andrew was waving a plastic golf club in the air. To try and encourage him to bring it down to a height that didn’t risk a disaster involving the club whacking Joel in the face, I took it off him and started to use it like a hockey stick to move a small ball along the grass…

Me: “Come on, let’s play hockey Andrew!”

Andrew: “No Mummy, don’t be silly, that’s not cocky, it’s golf!”

And to end on a similar note to where I began this post, we have another cute exchange between the brothers, overheard on the monitor one morning. Since the mornings have got lighter, we have reinstalled our lighting system – a cheaper version of a Gro-clock type thing, made from an ordinary lamp and a timer switch. When it’s off, it’s time to sleep, and when it comes on (at 7am), he is allowed to get up and go into Granny and Grandad’s room. But the thing is, there’s one rule for him, and one rule for little brother, who hasn’t understood the idea of the magic light and crescendos once he’s woken up until I go in and fish him out of their room. At about 6.30am I heard this: “No Joel, the light hasn’t come on yet, it’s not time to get up, we must sleep!” Nice try Andrew, I wish it was that easy to reason with your little brother.

Wot So Funee?