Home » The ducks don’t work – wot so funee?

The ducks don’t work – wot so funee?

We’ve had a bit of a break from wot so funee? posts over Easter and then last week when all I blogged about nappies for Resuable Nappy Week. As I’m getting back to normal on the blog this week, it seems only right to write up the best of the funees from the past few weeks.

I’ve written before about thhe fact that Andrew says yesterday for anything in the past and tomorrow for anything in the future. Fair enough, he’s a bit young still to be understanding the concept of weeks, months etc. But recently he’s had a thing about saying “this year”, which I think is related to when we explain to him that this year he is 3, but next year he will be 4. So we’ve had: “It’s quite a sunny day this year” and “I want Granny and Grandad to come home this year” – I presume he’s just thinking logically that it must mean ’now’, from when we say it, though he does know ’today’ and mainly uses that but ’this year’ creeps in too.

We quite often go to the local park on bin day, which, apart from being a pain to get the buggy through the gap between wheelie bins and garden fences on the pavement, means we get a running commentary on what the bins are like from our little chatterbox. He has quite rightly noticed that some are smaller than others on one particular road that we walk along – “Those are children bins and those are grown-up bins!” Yes that’s right Andrew, a whole family of bins line up on this street every Monday morning!

When we were on holiday with his four grandparents, Andrew was keen to do lots of activities with them. This included wanting to take some pictures with Grandad’s camera. As Grandad knelt down to take a photo of a pretty flower in the park, Andrew asked “Can I have a do?” No that isn’t a typo – he asked for a do rather than a go. Which to be fair to him, makes total sense, because taking photos is something that we ‘do’ rather than ‘go’ anywhere with. He hasn’t quite grasped the phrase ‘to have a go’, where ‘go’ is a noun not a verb like he’s used to.

Having studied several other languages, I’ve often thought that I’m glad I learned English natively as a child – it’s just so full of irregularities and peculiarities! We take it for granted as adult speakers of a language that we know these, but they can be really confusing to a learner, whether child or adult. One of these irregularities Andrew demonstrated perfectly when we were feeding the ducks and other birdlife down at the shores of Derwent Water on holiday…

Adult (I can’t remember who exactly): Look there are geese and ducks here Andrew.

Andrew: Aha!

A few minutes later….

Me: Watch that goose! Don’t go too close to him, he looks nasty!

Andrew: It’s not a goose, it’s a geese!

Me: I know, that’s so confusing!

And I proceeded to try and explain that it was one goose and two/three/more geese. Stupid English!

Then there was the time on another day of our holiday that he toddled off with Grandad to go and feed the ducks some duck food that we’d bought earlier in the week. We were between Rydal Water and Grasmere next to a small river that had a few ducks hanging around on it. But when they came back, Andrew was most disappointed because the ducks there didn’t want any of his special food: “the ducks don’t work here!” I mean come on, what were they playing at? Surely any self-respecting duck would want to eat some food wielded by an enthusiastic 3 year old, wouldn’t they?

As I’ve written before, no wot so funee? post would be complete without a foodie funee or two. Both boys would probably say that pasta is their favourite food. Joel can’t talk yet, though he’s very into signing at the moment, but the non-verbal cues that he gives me are very clear, i.e. shove it in fistfuls at a time until his cheeks are stuffed like a hamster and he can’t chew it down fast enough! I whipped up a quick pasta and cheese dish one lunchtime, like I often do (to call it a ‘dish’ is a little OTT, it’s just pasta mixed with grated cheese until it melts). Andrew was very impressed with what I served up in front of him, and when he tried to pick some up with his fork, a big clump of pasta came up with the fork: “Look, the pasta is cheesing together!” I thought that was quite an ingenious way of describing it actually.

Andrew has been a bit fussy with fruit and veg recently, though he did eat 4 pears today – he has a bit of a thing about this fruit, he gets his 5 a day, it’s just almost all pear! But I’m trying to be persistent with raisins on his breakfast cereal, which he used to always have until he got fussy with it a few weeks ago. So I asked the usual one morning…

Me: Would you like some raisins Andrew?

Andrew: No, I don’t like the dead ones!

Right…. wot so funee about that?

Wot So Funee?

6 Responses to “The ducks don’t work – wot so funee?”

  1. Awesome – so does he think that grapes are alive??
    Totally agree on the learning English thing – it must be so tricky for non-natives to learn.
    Thanks lovely for joining in x

  2. Debra says:

    You never really quite get how completely crazy the english language is until you have kids! It’s great listening to all the knew things they say though, I love how they so naturally work it all out.

  3. Jenny says:

    So funny I bet it’s so hard to learn english there are so many exceptions to the rules in english. I am desperately trying to learn spanish and I get things so messed up and backwards. Great post. #wotsofunee

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